midlife divorce

I think of midlife women as the Swiss Army knives of the world. Men seem more like sporks. (no disrespect men, I do admire your ability to single focus).
Thriving after divorce for me meant nourishing my body, mind and soul. It was about seeing possibilities rather than problems. It was about risking more and stepping outside of my comfort zone. It was about growth, respecting myself and living authentically.
How one woman fulfilled her dreams -- and kept her house -- after divorce.
Can a marriage survive a midlife crisis? We think so, although it can be very scary and unsettling for the spouse that is watching the other going through the midlife crisis.
There's no shame in being vulnerable to your spouse or working hard on your marriage. But it is problematic when you flail away at improving an irretrievably broken relationship while watching any semblance of self-respect disappear in the rearview.
The seeds of conscious uncoupling are sown somewhere in unconscious coupling. And, by unconscious coupling, I'm not referring to alcohol-fueled one-nighters. What I do mean is that many of us choose mates who aren't right for us by ignoring our unconscious motivations for doing so.
The recent stats on midlife divorce are startling. People over 50 are divorcing in higher numbers than ever before. And women are leading the charge -- filing in greater numbers than men. The "gray divorce" rate has doubled for this population in the last two decades.
When I ran into my own life crisis around age 49 -- a divorce and losing my job for the first time ever -- I took the time to sit and consider what I wanted more of in life. I decided I wanted more fun and meaning, but I did not realize at the time how much courage these goals would require.
Many people suffer midlife crises. Men in particular seem to be known for them, known for having them out loud and in color
His mom and I agreed to have the Hostage Exchange at a Panera Bread shop that, according to Google Maps, was off one of the