Mike Kelley

Black and Asian voters are most vulnerable at losing fair access to the polls and their voting rights.
There's been some whispering lately about an inevitable leveling off of the art market, and it seems that day has come.
One can hope that through special exhibitions and new acquisitions (it estimates that it averages one new acquisition a week), The Broad will discover, and embrace, its obligation to the public to truly represent the art of our time.
While it skews predictably toward a New York-centric perspective, it succeeds in many ways by introducing the works of lesser-known or hitherto marginalized artists alongside canonical classics.
It's possible to create a neat and tidy map tracing the progress of American art over the last 50 years. Yes, you can draw
Now consider an Athenian born the day Aristotle died. He is the inheritor of breathtaking riches; his city is the crown of culture. But as he grows into his thirties, forties, fifties, age will confide to him that things really are worse than they used to be.
Are you ready for a little bit of shock and scandal? Go to Jack Rutberg Gallery to see the double exhibition of painter Jerome
Right off the plane, our first stop was a studio visit with painter Kour Pour, who this past February enjoyed a sold-out show at Untitled NY in New York's Lower East Side.
It's highly unusual for a public figure -- especially a high-profile politician -- to reveal something very personal and rather uncommon about himself. And to do it willingly?
The L.A.-based photographer recently spent seven hours camped out with his camera in a park near the airport, taking photos