Mike Nichols

'Something Personal' reveals that Avedon and Nichols were lovers for at least two stretches in their lives.
"Oh," I mumbled, "I used to share an office with your kidney." (I am still in awe of Simon and Azenberg's press agent Bill
On March 24, 2016, Garry Shandling died suddenly of a heart attack. The day of his passing, not many television news feeds had mentioned anything substantial about this comic legend. Unfortunately, other world news had overshadowed the death of a true comic genius.
Jacob Bernstein's HBO documentary about his mother, Nora Ephron, proves the inside-the-box life is not worth living, as it gives you little material to work with. Probably the most famous Ephron line is "I'll have what she's having." It also sums up how many of us feel about Ephron. I'll have what she's having: the ambition, the wit, the genre-crossing, the credits, the confidence, the recipes, the large and talented circle of friends.
The patron saint of smart New York women, Nora Ephron is sorely missed. We have not seen her like since 2012 when she died
When I reflected upon my friendship with Mike Nichols as I watched the HBO special Becoming Mike Nichols, I was most moved by his comments about directing the final scene of The Graduate.
On February 22nd, HBO will air Becoming Mike Nichols, a conversation between actor/director/producer Mike Nichols and his friend and colleague Jack O' Brien, which was Recorded only four months before Nichols' death in 2014.
When PBS announced their American Masters documentary on Mike Nichols, I was relieved. Like so many admirers of his work, I grieved when he died in November of 2014.
On November 13th, Whoopi Goldberg turned 60. The actress, producer and The View co-host got her first Oscar nomination when she made her film debut in The Color Purple. And she's one of those rare people to have won the Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy, Daytime Emmy, Grammy and a Tony.
Stepping onto the stage would be transforming for young James Lecesne as he hungered for more. "Theater saved my life," he explains.
MR: Right. "Dr. Feelgood" is supposed to be one of the greatest air guitar songs ever. A Conversation with Mötley Crüe's
Manhattan is an island awash in film festivals. If there are new movies with a thematic niche, chances are there's a film festival with a clever lineup of screenings -- and film junkies lining up outside -- somewhere the city.
Here we are at the end of another calendar year -- 2014. When December rolls around, we tend to reflect on who we've lost in our own personal lives as well as those bigger-than-life mortals we affectionately call: celebrities.
Mike was a mensch. He was the wittiest man I ever broke bread with, and he was a quiet philanthropist who saved lives while he was influencing "the American century." He improved the quality of life of countless men and women, many of whom died, but many of whom, gratefully, live on.
Nichols' blend of brutality, bite and poignancy was his brilliance, spilling over with insight -- on film, in comedy, on stage, on TV, in love, and in life.
I realize I am merely using the passing of a great artist to gush about my favorite film, but The Graduate was more than that for me.
This week, President Obama announced the temporary halt of deportations for an estimated 4.4 million undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. It was a welcome, if belated, move for a president who, as of April, had deported 2 million people. One might think Republicans would welcome a policy that keeps families together and rewards hard work. But the move was met with the obligatory threats of shutdowns and impeachment. "In the days ahead, the people's House will rise to this challenge," thundered John Boehner. But, really, all they have to do is what President Obama suggested: simply "pass a bill." If only Congress were as hardworking as the families whose lives their ugly inaction has put into limbo. Meanwhile, we lost Mike Nichols, a man who embodied the American dream: an immigrant who came here to realize his talents and left America better than he found it. Now there's a challenge to rise to.
In the early seventies I had the honor of dating Mike Nichols. In no way is my remembrance meant to take away from the love he had for the fascinating and the cherished Diane Sawyer who also has been kind to me, but I feel sharing a historic moment about him is important and, sadly so, newsworthy.
1. About how many people will be covered in President Obama's plan to give relief from deportations? a. 5 million b. 11 million