military coup

Recep Tayyip Erdogan has ruled Turkey for more than a decade. He should be enjoying his time of triumph. He towers above the political system, able to create and dismiss governments at will.
Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. ― George Santayana, Philosopher On February 27, 1933, a fire
If Barack Obama and John Kerry give in to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's demand to extradite Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen, it will lead to more than his imprisonment and/or execution.
As a global community, we always have to aspire for the rule of law and democracy. We always have to side with the people and their representatives, rather than those who would use force against the former to achieve their aims.
Coup plotters failed to realize that coups against stable governments rarely succeed.
Unarmed people recaptured CNN Turk and the bridges across the Bosphorus, braving gunfire to recapture democracy for their country.
On June 24, 2015, we went to the police station, but to file a complaint of brutality rather than respond to the summons against us. At last, our powerless bare hands which had been unable to shake the junta's power began to cause them worry.
how could the United States dictate to the rest of the world what to do and how to behave while doing the very opposite?
Today we think of the 1970s as the heyday of the conspiracy thriller, but the reality is that the conspiracy genre flourished a decade earlier, before most of the disillusionment. And it did so in large part at the encouragement of none other than the President of the United States.
A country which in some way or the other makes itself prominent across the global arena more often because of events which shun its image and bring it into the limelight. Land of the pure, has recurrently surfaced in the form of news that people of the world do not have pleasant memories of.
One thing that could make a difference would be if the tourists stopped coming, prompting the exchange rate, foreign exchange reserves, and stock market to fall substantially. Perhaps, if there was enough collective pain, the red and yellow shirts would determine that it is in everyone's interest to find common ground.
It may be too late to save Egypt. Only an intelligent use of military aid suspension has any hope of reversing the slide into an abyss.
As a citizen of a country that had to live through five coup d'états and military memorandums in last five decades, I advise my Egyptian friends to beware of any type of military rule. A day will come when a new generation of writers grown up on Naguib Mahfouz's books will tell the story of today's coup.
When the Egyptian military overthrew President Morsi, I did not expect a long debate on the question whether this power grab should be labeled a coup. It looks like a coup, it smells like a coup, it acts like a coup. So who would seriously want to challenge that observation?