millenials-jobs

With no certification restrictions, it's not surprising that it's appealing to the millennials. Since all it takes is a video
In my seven years of travel across the world, I have worked with girls in economically disadvantaged societies, whose passion for a career in STEM is rooted in a desire for upward economic mobility as much as a love for those subjects.
When it comes to education and careers, remind yourself often that each of us has our own unique journey. Don't be afraid to live yours, and don't fear change along the way. Think big, work hard, tap into your passion, and stay open-minded as you pursue your path.
If mainline denominations have taken a nosedive in membership, money, and influence (which they have), and if you want a chance to figure out why (which I do), it seems like a good thing to start looking at the age demographic where the losses have been heaviest.
Millennials are a highly collaborative, innovative generation. This, in turn, makes them uniquely well-positioned to work across party lines to reach outside-the-box bipartisan solutions.
Every month that payment will remind me that I am fortunate to live in a country that lets young people take out these loans to pursue their dreams, even when their dreams aren't solely of financial greatness.
For many qualified young professionals, formal leadership was perceived as an exhausting, thankless role. Yet, Millennials have ambition. Young professionals do aspire to leadership roles -- just not the ones that their Baby Boomer colleagues have coveted so fiercely.
It's the quarter-life crisis no one talks about. It hits long after the panic of job-hunting subsides and right before you realize you should've left your job six months ago. And it's why you aren't wildly pursuing the ambitious career goals of your greener years.
A combination of prolonged slow job creation and Baby Boomers who just won't quit work are threatening the orderly flow of employees from hire to retire. It has created what I call the gray ceiling.