million man march

On the eve of the "March for Our Lives," here's a look at other moments when Americans spoke out en masse.
The Constitution gives all citizens freedom of worship, freedom of religion, freedom of conscience, and separation of Religion and State. It's time we start living up to our principles.
Despite the lack of media coverage leading up to the event, the message was clearly received. Thousands still peacefully gathered on The National Mall where harmony, institutional reform and human rights were demanded.
On the 16th day of October 1995, Nation of Islam's Leader Louis Farrakhan called African American men to the National Mall to take heed to his message of commitment to serving as strong pillars not only in the household, but in the black community.
My son had the opportunity to make history, which is now HIS story that he can share once he gets older. With all that has been going on, and to be able to stand with thousands, leaders and celebrities included, is monumental within itself.
I wouldn't be mad if there were a Million Man March every year. Yet I hope that when this and other like gatherings happen we can do the work and stay with the goal of uplifting black men. I hope we can do this without the need to push down any "type" of black woman.
The ideological and political formations that have fueled Black progress are messy with the particulars of each person's lived experience and beliefs. When forged in operational unity, however, it has been exactly these asymmetrical formations that have been the most terribly effective.
From the moment he arrived to the march, we shifted our individual energies towards Justice. We'd come together to be a part of the historic moment but we were mostly there to support his presence while we planted seeds in his growing consciousness of self.
The gathering in D.C. this weekend was not about Louis Farrakhan.
The fight for justice lives on.