Mission: Accepted

On the last day of school, as I said goodbye to everyone, I didn't fully understand that it was the last time I'd be seeing the same people every day, or following a bell schedule and even having a gym class.
It's strange and amazing how a couple of things can shape the future and your path in life. If we look back to what caused us to go to college and what things lead us there, you'd be amazed as well.
Surely, I am excited for a new life in higher education, but I think it is truly important to take a look back and reflect on how far we have all come.
While it's true that work study and possible loans may haunt me later, I don't want to regret not choosing Wellesley because of money.
The way high school is set up (or at least how mine is) lends for a very repetitive schedule. As a senior who has one month of high school left, and already knows where I'm going to college, that is exactly what I am: tired of it.
If you're still deciding between colleges, make a list! Now is a good time to slow down and look into the nitty-gritty details. Put down statistics that matter to you, like costs, student body ratios, programs or subjects that you would like to pursue.
All I could do was yell, "I got in! I got in! Mom, I got in!" Tears of joy streamed down my face and it hugged my mother. I couldn't believe it. I actually did it.
As graduation steadily approaches, I have mixed feelings of excitement and fear. I am ecstatic yet afraid to be thrown out into the "unknown" for four more years.
Decisions, decisions. At the end and after so much time being invested, the reaping of our hard work pays off: We're getting to go to college.
As I pass the halfway-mark of my last semester of high school, I am ecstatic for college, yet slightly sad that I have applied to over 30 jobs and not one employer caught the bait.
I read and read, and re-read again for clarity; my eyes were slowly adjusting to the hard and truthful fact that I was staring at an early acceptance letter from Smith College
Looking back at senior year in retrospect, it was an emotional roller coaster where I almost lost all my motivation. In December, I was so worked up with not being accepted to my top choice school. Four months later, I'm a lot calmer.
My mind is on other things: Who will Frank Underwood target next? Will there be a Frozen 2 (the first one was AMAZING)? But most importantly, my mind has been revolved around one thing: college decisions.
I believe it is the second worst thing about the application process, because a rejection can make you doubt yourself, your future and brings about the "what ifs." What if I did better on the SAT's? What if I took on more APs? What if I did more extracurricular activities?
At the end of the day, keep your eyes peeled. Don't look down at small scholarships because every little bit definitely helps. Definitely start applying early and apply broadly. You will soon see the fruit of all your labor.
While trying to calm me down, my mother called this ordeal the test to become an accountant, and that it's just one of the things that I'll have to deal with as an adult. After this whole fiasco, I don't think I'm fit to be an accountant.
I also wish schools had a better way to communicate with applicants. Like, calling you or emailing you and telling you the next step in the process so you can be sure you're on top of things. But I guess that's just the high school student in me talking.
Graduation is right around the corner and this is certainly not the time to mess up all the hard work I have put into school my whole life. You can almost taste it; just keep pushing on. The finish line is right ahead!
After revising and editing the writing supplement with my mentors and clicking submit, I couldn't help but smile at the confirmation page. At that moment, I finally believed that I had discovered my ideal college!
Now that college applications are over, I'm onto the next critical task: finding money in order to be able to pay for college tuition.