mistake

"All In" host Chris Hayes had some explaining to do.
Fox News accidentally got an earful from an anti-Trump lawmaker live on air.
Failure is inevitable. How we move forward from failure determines whether failure becomes a biologically ingrained habit or a spotty memory. What will you choose?
When I talk to attendees of my seminars or to new clients, I often encounter the same lost person I once was.
Instead of fearing what might happen in the unknown, instead of imagining and trying to pre-control worst-case scenarios, we can plan as best we can... and then move forward with a sense of curiosity. We can let things progress, and then respond as needed.
Putting ourselves down can be a tempting habit. It makes us seem humble. It fills the dead air of conversation. It gets ahead of others who might put us down first.
It's not in my nature to take a pause for something when I'm dedicated to getting it done a certain way. But what I know is that stopping and asking myself if there might be an easier way is worth the potential time and energy I would save.
Whatever your opinion on this matter, there are a few life lessons we can all learn from the buffet line. 4. Sometimes we
Starting now, we need to get over ourselves. We need to know that, sometimes, looking bad is actually a good thing...because it means we're trying something new, we're stretching ourselves, we're taking on a new adventure.
To acknowledge imperfections, some of us have to confront our idealized image, a narcissistic view of the self that dictates we must be perfect. In this case, a mistake and the need to apologize, can be experienced as like a blemish that needs to be hidden.
Know that moments of foul will happen, and do your best to deal with it in a way that doesn't damage you or others. And know that, no matter what, the foul will pass.