mobile money

It's no secret that we live in an interconnected world where sending and receiving payments can occur with just a click of a button. For business owners, that's welcome news since this makes it more convenient for you to get paid online, as well as increasing your cash flow since payments happen in real-time.
In Herbert Hoover's day, progress meant "a chicken in every pot." Today, it means a bank in every pocket - an advancement
In the sustainable development priorities for the next 15 years adopted by heads of states in New York this week, the United Nations has highlighted financial inclusion as an important enabler for poorer households in the informal economies of the global south to increase resilience and better capture opportunities.
Today, with more mobile phones than people on Earth, any savvy foreign policy recognizes the power of this small device to do good or evil in the world. Gone are the days when rebels and reformers fought only using guns and physical bombs; this portable machine is as important as any as weapon.
In recent years, the banking and finance industries have not done a lot to earn the trust of consumers in the West. But in
The focus of the media attention during the president's visit was the historic invitation to be the honored guest at India's Republic Day -- a first for the U.S. However, what got little notice was something the president left behind, something that will likely contribute to the biggest transformation for the poor in India.
Beyond being digital, what does Bitcoin have in common with electronic money and financial inclusion generally? At this point, there seem to be more differences than similarities and it's important not to conflate electronic money with the virtual currency.
When people trust digital means of payment people start going "cash-lite." That's why mobile money is spreading in a number of developing economies, and why 40 percent of Americans now typically carry less than $20 cash in their wallets.
Three years ago I blogged "Is Financial Inclusion Imminent in India?" I have just returned from India after observing the progress India has made towards financial inclusion. Yes, there has been progress, but much remains to be done.
I fall down. A lot. But, in the process of founding two companies, I've learned a little secret: If you want to be the founder of a successful startup, there is nothing more important than resilience.
In the aftermath of the global crisis, public opinion in the North is less convinced of the merits of an inclusive financial system. How, exactly, does it help, when the reckless expansion of mortgage credit in North America just triggered the deepest recession in recent memory?
Suffice to say, the opportunity is real, it's huge, and it's just waiting to be tapped. It's important to note that solar crowdfunding may be instrumental in making it happen.
While many parts of the world have been struggling with flat or flagging economic growth, Africa looks set to carry on growing at a fair clip.
Jordan is a relatively stable country in a very bad neighborhood. If that stability can continue, the intelligence, optimism, passion and entrepreneurism I experienced while there will accelerate and, perhaps, things will become slightly less complex. And, maybe, the neighborhood will improve.
Projects to pay government benefits and humanitarian aid in electronic form are a boon. They increase security and accountability while decreasing cost. Until now, however, such projects have been isolated, with no worldwide, deliberate, coordinated push.
Africa is blazing a trail in financial access innovation.
This shift could happen "overnight." Like the introduction of the desktop computer and cell phone technology, Mobile Money
What type of jobs would you assign if you could mobilize two billion people in major cities in 60 countries around the world?