monastery

Two Buddhist teachers reveal how conquering anger and quiet resistance is key to bringing lasting change to the world
Anesthesia seems to be an ideal sentiment for describing the world we live in today. We're consumed by our phones, computers
Mane, France Those looking for a more introspective, less overt Easter escape can find respite at one of the many convents
The victory of ignorance over memory is the strongest evidence of the failure of peaceful coexistence between the past and the present. But as long as we are not speechless and indifferent to the destruction of our civilizational past, we have a chance to save humanity from the incalculable evil that human beings are capable of bringing about.
Yesterday, ISIS destroyed St. Elijah's, a 1400-year-old Christian monastery just outside of Mosul -- part of their mission to obliterate history and anything that doesn't fit into their warped version of Islam.
There's something comforting about rituals. Pasang Tsaga knows this very well. Every time she opens the Jewels of Buddha, she lifts the gate, lights the incense and turns on the meditative chanting music.
No fun. No sex. No booze. No hair. No eyebrows. Could a playboy adventurer like myself find enlightenment by binning life's materialism and becoming a Buddhist monk? Could a period of abstinence in the remote cloisters of a Thai monastery save the cankered soul from additional rot?
MOUNT ANGEL — Morning comes softly here. There are no cars, no sirens, no trash trucks, no dogs. Only a hundred chattering
I do windows. Unfortunately, I do them every couple of years, which gives the windows plenty of time to get dirty, and even then it is clear that I don't do them very well because I have always considered the job a pane in the glass.
I've been visiting the Holy Mountain since my teenage years, either as a pilgrim or as a professional photographer. However
All of this history is set in Portugal's Centro region that's barely a one-hour drive from the airport in Lisbon. And yet, it couldn't be more distinct from the capital.
Technology can only enrich our lives to the degree that we can stay present with ourselves and each other. I have to remind myself that I can still love my phone, but it will never love me back. The only "access" I need is to myself and the people that matter most. Everything else can wait.
From my experiences at these various monasteries, I found that it wasn't until I sat through these things in silence and space that I could reach a much deeper and often darker place of self-discovery, which led and still leads me to more of my true self.
The Fontevraud monastery is smack in the center of France, in the Loire region, some 195 miles south of Paris, a royal destination if there ever was one.
I also thought I'd try an experiment. Whenever I found myself miserable about cleaning, I would turn it around 180 degrees and decide to be happy doing it. To my shock, it worked immediately! I was happy because I'd decided to be happy! If only I'd discovered this simple knack 20 years ago.
The Cloisters is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art given over to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. With a collection of over 2,000 medieval pieces, the museum's structure is itself part of the exhibit.
The red-roofed complexes with their Byzantine churches in their lofty aeries are indeed pretty, but it's their incredible perches atop the pinnacles that make the place -- and not the hordes upon hordes of tourists taking selfies.
I was up for the sunrise and climbed the Inca ruins with my paints. Words cannot adequately capture how truly spectacular this site is, and how amazing that they could build these structures in this inaccessible place.
Silence has allowed me to be present to death. Allowing death to be present in my life, gives me the perspective to be mindful of the present.