Montgomery Clift

We know that celebrities inspire popular baby names, from Audrey (Hepburn) to (John) Lennon. But celebrities also choose
So, as you can imagine, I take the Oscars very seriously, and follow all the brouhaha leading up to the live Sunday broadcast. And this year was no exception. But for me, along with a few good friends, the party actually started the day before, on Saturday. That's how it went...
One of our favorite queer celebrities is set to take on a new role playing one of the most iconic gay men to ever work in
There are three ways to look at the work in the new show at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art: "Stroke, from Under the Mattress to the Museum Walls," a show of gay erotic art, mostly drawings, during the "Golden Age of Gay Erotica.
Alfred Hitchcock set I Confess starring Montgomery Clift as the priest, in the capital of the province of Quebec, Quebec
Matt Bomer will portray screen legend Montgomery Clift in a newly announced biopic. IMDB listed the role on Bomer's filmography
In French director/co-screenwriter Catherine Corsini's latest film, Three Worlds, three disparate characters -- Al, Juliette and Vera -- cross paths in the aftermath of a tragic car accident on the streets of Paris.
At 74, his eyes are still exceptionally blue and a little bit mischievous. He sits calmly, listens to a question about how often he is offered roles like the one he plays in Unfinished Song, and smiles.
A Separation May 1 at 6 p.m. and May 2 at 8:30 p.m. Tickets: $6 to $10 In Darkness May 1 at 8:15 p.m. and May 2 at 6 p.m
Which Hollywood director actually made the most great movies? In the Alsace area of Germany, future director William Wyler was born. Here is a sampling of his best movies covering three full decades.
Borgnine spoke to me primarily about portraying a retired World War II Marine in Another Harvest Moon -- it's obvious the jovial actor had to use all the talent he has to be convincing as a fellow at the end of his rope.
In her Oscar-winning film In a Better World, Danish director Susanne Bier has the audacity to enter places where madness and inhumanity flourish.
We have lost a national treasure. As a kid, I remember vividly Life magazine's 1972 cover of Elizabeth Taylor turning 40, and glimpsing what glamor really meant.
The late Deborah Kerr was the kind of star and personality we rarely see anymore: a lady first and foremost, who, even playing women of dubious virtue, projected an innate sense of class, dignity, even nobility.
It is exceedingly strange and more than a little sad that actresses Olivia de Havilland, 94, and her sister Joan Fontaine, 93, have been estranged for many years, the result of an intense sibling rivalry which has never dissipated.
Jennifer Jones always defied easy analysis, so much the better for us to simply surrender to her films themselves.
In her first movie, she kissed Marlon Brando. And then she won an Oscar. How many actresses get that kind of a debut? But then, how many actresses are as wonderful as Eva Marie Saint?
Clift's eyes held secrets, and not merely the secrets we know about after discovering his real life. There's more to Clift
Brando's filmography provides sufficient proof that the actor's own demons helped stall a career that in its hey-day (the mid-late fifties) seemed limitless in potential.