montreal protocol

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Here is what countries just announced. 105 countries send a clear signal that they want a strong agreement to significantly
Since its adoption in 1987, the Montreal Protocol has been widely acclaimed as the world's most successful environmental treaty, putting the ozone layer on the path to recovery.
The stage has been set - now can we get a deal that the climate, and the Pacific Islands, deserve? Proposals vary widely
October will be the time to make a decision that reverberates for generations to come.
"We can now be confident that the things we’ve done have put the planet on a path to heal," one scientist says.
President Obama and his team at the State Department led by Secretary John Kerry and Climate Envoy Todd Stern made a singular
India and the United States strengthened their commitments to strong climate action today - particularly on the supercharged climate pollutants known as hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).
In their May 27th declaration, the leaders of the G7 commit for the first time to cutting near-term warming by phasing down short-lived super pollutants black carbon, methane, and HFCs.
There'll be a couple of bears in the room when the leaders of the five Nordic nations meet President Obama at the White House tomorrow. One is Russian aggression, and how to curb it. The other menace is less publicized, but even more formidable -- climate change.
We are well into 2016, which means that the Heritage Foundation's much vaunted annual Index of Economic Freedom is up and running. The Index's striking heat-map feature highlights the incredible economic disparities that exist between different countries.
The misuse of land, symptomatic of any Middle Eastern country with agricultural territory, as well as construction of roads, airports, housing, and prestige projects on arable stretches in several countries has been robbing terrain of valuable assets as foreseen by a very astute Egyptian scientist.
In the first test of post-Paris climate mitigation, Parties to the Montreal Protocol made significant progress last week to eliminate warming from super greenhouse gases known as hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, used primarily as refrigerants in air conditioners and other equipment. HFCs are one of the six main greenhouse gases.
At the close of a week's negotiations in Dubai, countries have made progress toward the oasis of an HFC phase-down amendment to the Montreal Protocol. If they keep driving their camels, there's hope they can reach the oasis in 2016.
The countries of the world agreed today to work together in 2016 to use the Montreal Protocol to eliminate the global warming contribution from one of the six main greenhouse gases by phasing down refrigerants called hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs.
Safer chemicals and more energy efficient technologies can provide cooling without severe climate implications. Shifting to these alternatives could avoid the equivalent of 12 times the current annual carbon pollution of the United States by 2050.
Concern about the efficiency of air conditioning in very hot climates has been an obstacle to winning agreement on a phase-down of the powerful heat-trapping chemicals known as HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons). Now we have new test data on the performance of next-generation refrigerants in air conditioners commonly used in homes and buildings.
There's a chance to score a climate victory next week on the super-pollutants called hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs - one that would give a boost to the Paris climate summit next month.
Adding to these governmental actions, an array of companies and trade associations reported on progress implementing HFC reduction commitments made a year ago, and announced new commitments for 2015.