morals

Answer by Paul Bloom, Professor of Psychology & Cognitive Science, author of Against Empathy, on Quora. More questions:​ Empathy
We know you've heard it before, but consider just how much time you spend online and how much time you spend worrying about your digital self image
I'm going to preface this by saying I'm no expert on the inner workings of celebrity life. I write this from experiences I've lived and observations from my time working in entertainment as an assistant and in public relations.
RefugePoint is focused on finding solutions for the most at risk refugees--those who fall through the cracks of humanitarian
Though HRV may play a role in wisdom, Grossman thinks that there isn't a lot one can do to change it--it's more a matter of individual differences. But, he says, we may want to consider training people in impartial, third-person perspective taking to help them be wiser in life, whether they have high HRV or not.
I believe that God's laws are still in effect today because God makes himself known to us by the law that He writes on all peoples' hearts. The law that is written on our hearts is the same law that God gave Moses over 2000 years ago.
I don't know if we'll ever pinpoint all the reasons why true crime has become such a sensation, but as we inevitably continue to indulge ourselves, we must make sure we consider that real people experienced a significant loss in every single one of these stories.
We all grow up with a certain set of values. Our families of origin have a tremendous influence on our lives, and although some values may be later deemed unnecessary, or need to be adjusted, others are still viable and have great impact.
It was slightly cold and pale, and near silence filled the air. Grey, opaque light dusted the space with stillness. Four hundred and sixty-six feet tall, the tower soars over everything you can see. By today's standards, it isn't that tall.
From a strictly biblical point of view, being born on Earth is a test. All our actions will eventually be judged by an omnipotent God who will determine whether we go to heaven or hell. Our deeds, sinful or not, determine where we spend eternity.
When we hear the term "twins," we often think of two things that are alike -- twin beds, twin turbo engines, etc. However, as the father of twins (who happen to turn ten-years-old today), I can attest to the fact that twins are most certainly quite different from one another.
"Mom, is that wrong?" I weigh her question heavily on my heart, knowing full well that my answer will be her truth. I think through exactly what I want to instill in her perspective, her vision of this new concept that revealed itself right before her innocent eyes.
2) The Gut, the Brain, and Morals Exploring further the link between the gut and the brain, if undiagnosed celiac disease
All kids dabble in stretching the truth or outright lying, and of course it's to their benefit to learn that lies have consequences. To be clear, all kids lie at one point or another. I know you may be thinking yours has never lied to you, but if so you're in La-la-land. Once you've come to grips with this truth keep reading.
The pope provides a moving and profound view on the deep connection between environmental and social issues, between humans and animals, and between spiritual and practical. He also hits head-on the contentious issue of man's "dominion" over nature: Many have interpreted the Bible to indicate that man should conquer nature, but the pope explains how wrong that reading is.
Leading up to the release, much of the news coverage talked about an upcoming "climate declaration." Yes, this is a core part of the discussion, but the Pope is clearly concerned with environmental conditions overall.
A leader of a college or university (or any non-profit, for that matter) should do what one can for those who work at the institution. One thing one can do at no cost is simply to be appreciative of hard work and to thank people for their work. Doing so goes a long way, a very long way.
No portrait in any house had ever shocked me more. I recently drove through Mississippi, and stopped in a town known for its extensive pre-Civil War architecture.
To improve the process of ethical oversight of research, we need to change our attitudes, and recognize far more fully that complicated moral issues, strains and vagaries are involved.
Faced with various milestones, situations and challenges we can all relate to -- such as fear of failure, insecurities and wanting to belong -- each episode left the viewer with a clearly defined message or "takeaway" which, more often than not, came down to one simple principle: Always try to do the right thing.