Moss Hart

One of the Broadway season's very highest lights, the George S. Kaufman-Moss Hart You Can't Take It With You remains brightly illuminated now that replacements Richard Thomas and Anna Chlumsky have joined the hilariously accomplished ensemble under Scott Ellis's eloquent direction.
Sometimes things aren't quite what they seem. Walking through Washington Market Tavern's unassuming doors prepares you for a gastropub experience but what lies ahead is more akin to straight up fine dining minus the white table clothes.
As a kid, I used to bring home the plays of Kaufman and Hart from the local library and read them aloud with my little sister and my little brother, Elisa and Mark, on long Saturday afternoons.
The lush new production of You Can't Take It With You boasts at least a half-dozen such turns, brimming to near-bursting from a piece that juggles slapstick and drama and somehow manages to keep them both alight.
Rarely have I seen such a large collection of scene-stealers on one stage. Check that. There's so much hilarity occurring that no one can steal a complete scene. What these thieving actors do is steal extended moments.
In You Can't Take It With You, things don't go quite as smoothly for the Sycamore family while entertaining their daughter's fiancé and his parents, but what ensues is -- to say the least -- extremely funny.
When I was a child my mother was Jed's maid. After I grew up, he tracked me down to work as his personal assistant as he attempted to produce one last play called Great Day For the Race.
A few weeks ago, I wasn't feeling so great. My allergies were bothering me and I was tired, as I often am this time of year. Then I went to the theater. Miraculously I felt better during Act One.
My friends are never very excited about new plays. What is The Realistic Joneses and why did celebrities want to be in it? Is Casa Valentina an atmospheric production where they treat us like we're in a resort?