mountaintop removal

IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: Donald Trump taps Exxon Mobil CEO for Secretary of State; Potential Interior Department chief wants
Yes, Virginia, in 2016 formerly bankrupt coal companies continue to blast away historic Coal River Mountain and adjacent communities.
Its new policy takes aim at mountaintop removal. But there are a lot of unanswered questions.
IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: President Obama says rest of world disturbed by our GOP Presidential candidates; New study finds
The landmark conviction of former Massey Energy CEO and coal baron Don Blankenship today on a misdemeanor conspiracy charge to violate mine safety laws is a small, but historic first step in holding mining outlaws accountable for their reckless operations.
All the president needs to do is look outside his window -- and acknowledge an American tragedy that should be abolished, not regulated.
The portrait of Lorelei dispels many of the stereotypes of so-called "tree huggers" working to hold the coal industry and its sycophantic politicians accountable to various water and mining regulations.
The extraordinary show of support for the ACHE Act campaign effectively acknowledges that the only defenders of the cancer-linked radical strip mining operations are a handful of absentee coal companies, indicted coal baron Don Blankenship, and their fringe supporters in Congress.
There was never a time when Jean's Ritchie's voice wasn't part of my life. Growing up as I did in a folk music community, she was a constant influence. Best of all was Jean's own singing -- gentle, unassuming and beautiful, with that clear, high voice.
Unfolding with the plaintive air of an elegy, Blood on the Mountain captures mining companies' blatant disregard for the health and lives of coal miners -- and the mountains they call home -- as a timely reminder of the legacy of an essentially outlaw industry and its 150-year reign in West Virginia.
While I love to write about clean energy solutions, Appalachian transition and coalfield regeneration, and the inspiring regenerative city movement, to ignore the deadly impacts of mountaintop removal and coal mining is a betrayal to the residents living on the front lines of coal mining mayhem today.
I stand by this critique of what Franzen's essay gets wrong, but I didn't credit what it implicitly gets right ⎯- that is, the climate fight is disconnected from what we individually cherish. My heart, too, rebels at the idea that tons of carbon avoided trump everything else.
Let's be real: If we can't end mountaintop removal, a cancer-linked extreme form of mining that only provides a fraction of our national coal production, how can we expect to move forward on climate change and public health?
A powerful notice of intent to sue the Obama administration was filed by attorney Patrick C. McGinley for its failure to prepare and implement a federal program for West Virginia's documented oversight and violations of required strip mining regulations. His brief on behalf of several environmental groups reads like a spellbinding rap sheet of an incorrigible offender.
A day of reckoning is arriving in Appalachia. A renewed coalition of citizens groups called the People's Foot movement is confronting state and federal agencies directly for their complicity in ignoring the growing and indisputable evidence on deadly health effects from mountaintop removal mining.
Fourteen months after poorly regulated coal-washing chemicals contaminated the Elk River in West Virginia, coal country residents and supporters are gearing up for an epic showdown on March 16 with the state's Department of Environmental Protection -- and the U.S. Congress -- over the mounting death toll and health crisis from mountaintop removal strip mining.
The problem is not that President Obama has done too much to regulate coal mining; the problem is that he could do more -- much more -- to protect the families and communities of Appalachia.
In its 1970 editorial, "The Great Soil Swindle," the New York Times declared: "This ravaging of farmland, pasture and woods in the single-minded pursuit of cheap coal is a desecration." That desecration continues today.