Multiverse

The new treatise on the existence of parallel universes was published on Friday.
My point is that whatever is real and compelling about god-talk, it's approached far more adequately with plural language, plural deities, plural visions, even plural realities, all of which can expand our spiritual imagination to better understand and engage religion and spirituality in its wild, deep and powerful diversity today.
These are exciting times for the field of physics. In 2012, researchers announced the discovery of the Higgs boson, a discovery four decades in the making, costing billions of dollars (and euros, pounds, yen and yuan) and involving some of the best minds on the planet.
If our Galaxy truly contains many intelligent civilizations, some of which may be ahead of us by a billion years, how is it possible that we have not seen any sign of them yet? Nobody knows the answer to this so-called "Fermi Paradox," but one of the speculations is that there exists some bottleneck to the emergence of intelligent civilizations, and that this bottleneck could have either been in our past, or we will hit upon it in the future.
Beware what follows! I have no more right to be thinking, much less writing, these words than the last drunk picked up in Times Square last night. But, I am, possibly, different from that guy because I read the Science Times in the New York Times on June 9th. I doubt they supply the TIMES daily in jail?
But in the last half century or so, a great many theories either cannot be proven through gathering evidence or barely can be.
Does it also suggest that humans might someday be able to interact with other universes? "There are some who are completely
Where did the universe come from, and how is it evolving? Those questions made little sense a century or so ago, before the
I'm not saying it's OK to poison cats -- it's not; it's animal cruelty -- and I'm not saying I want to poison my cat. I'm just saying I would find it very selfless of him if he were to volunteer for the experiment.
Scientists have assigned the role of Mister Answer to science, the source of knowledge on every subject. This is peculiar because science does not accept a complete body of knowledge at any one time as final, therefore no answer can be final. This is how science progresses. Scientists, though, often forget that.
Greater comfort, I think, is to be found in the realization that infinity is as problematic for science as it is for religion. Much as an infinitely perfect God leads to logical clashes with reality, an infinite multiverse bedevils attempts to apply tools such as probabilities to our understanding of the world.
At an international conference in Mexico a few years ago, Richard Dawkins, having expounded at length on how sexual natural selection explains life on Earth without any need for a "creator," went on to say, "And I am sure that something like the principle of natural selection operates in the physical universe as well." Sounds totally silly? Well, there's more to it: a huge irony.
I picked up Amir Aczel's book, "Why Science Does Not Disprove God," with eager anticipation, hoping that he might make peace between contending factions. Alas, I sighed, upon finishing the book, the chasm remains unbridged.
Let's look at the very vocal minority of theoreticians who, without a shred of experimental evidence to support their claims, are now telling us what, in their view, nature is truly made of. They do it mostly through recent books aimed at the average reader. I will survey the most widely read of these books.
Although we may not be able to directly observe any other universes, their existence seems to be logically required if our model building is on the right track.
In De Luce, Grosseteste assumed that the universe was born from an explosion that pushed everything, matter and light, out
"In most of the models of inflation, if inflation is there, then the multiverse is there," Stanford University theoretical
It's a sensational breakthrough involving not only our cosmic origins, but also the nature of space: by producing the first-ever detection of Hawking radiation (the process by which inflation's rapid doubling generates these gravitational waves), the BICEP2 team has found the first experimental evidence for quantum gravity.
The picture of "eternal inflation," if true, provides a new perspective on our place within the cosmic landscape.
Reality is waiting for us to creep closer to understanding its mysteries. In the meantime, it won't falter or come to an end. Reality will remain our home, our source, and the ground state of our being far beyond the lifetime of the foreseeable universe.