mystery novels

Mark Rubinstein's latest novel, The Lovers' Tango, received the Gold Medal for Popular Fiction in the 2016 Benjamin Franklin
I love all sorts of mysteries, and most of the ones I read have a murder case central to the plot. I also love a good heist, a smart con, and, sometimes, I crave intrigue in a library or on a college campus. If you're ready for a mystery sans corpse, take a look at these five crime novels.
"People who have had very unhappy childhoods are pretty good at inventing themselves," le Carré once said. What began as
Alex Segura is a writer at Archie Comics, best known for the epic crossover between the Riverdale Gang and KISS. He's not a name you'd associate with hardboiled mystery thrillers, but it's going to happen.
Call them thrillers, crime or detective fiction; all of these and the slang term, whodunits, have been used to describe the mystery or crime story. Readers, it seems, love a good mystery.
Is it cold outside, or are these books just sending chills down your spine?
Back in the prehistoric times before the Internet - when dinosaurs roamed the earth, the West was wild and the East was still the mysterious Orient - mystery fandom wasn't a simple matter of keeping abreast of daily blog updates and Yahoo group digests...it had to be earned.
Hard Case Crime editor Charles Ardai has professed both his admiration for Mystery Grandmaster Lawrence Block as a writer and as a friend. With the publication of The Girl With The Deep Blue Eyes, Ardai has agreed to face the bright lights and rubber hoses of the interrogation room.
Hendricks and Engelmann are perfectly juxtaposed and the secondary characters are all equally well written. This is Holm's first novel, and I hope there are many more to come. If a movie deal hasn't been made, I'm sure there's one in the works.
Child has a successful formula, which usually introduces the reader to the villain from the start. Make Me is a total mystery, and by page 200 I had no idea what was happening, but I was unable to put the book down or shake a terrible sense of foreboding.
Numbers be damned, though. In one evening I was able to make a dozen new friends and entertain them, and was absolutely glowing inside. Write on, people.
The light wanes and we watch the green hills and the tide shifting as if it were a film. An hour passes like one minute.
As a practicing psychologist, I find that my clients are fascinated by dreams. Most of them have read a little Freud, who
The first-person narrator is the imposer of order in a world of chaos--or rather, deceit, lies, hypocrisy, where nothing is as it seems. And yet reading a classic of noir fiction like Dashiell Hammett's The Continental Op is a revelation.
Imagine yourself deep in a forest. You notice your travel companions rifling through your backpack while muttering to themselves at half-volume. Unsettled, you retire to your tent where you find a mysterious key.
I once introduced a best-selling thriller writer at a reading here in Michigan and mentioned -- among other things -- that he was a finalist for some award. When he got to the podium he quipped, "You know what a finalist means, don't you? It means you didn't win."
The book is a series of little bits of overlapping color that finally create a full picture.
It's refreshing to discover a noteworthy female protagonist in Cate Harlow. She's the fiery private investigator in author Kristen Houghton's latest endeavor, For I Have Sinned.
After spending this past weekend discussing what makes a truly great mystery novel at the Bouchercon World Mystery Convention, I found myself analyzing my favorites. Why did these particular books have such a hold on my imagination?