Naftali Bennett

Ending the occupation is not a charitable gift to the Palestinians. Only by accepting their right to a state of their own will Israel remain a Jewish and democratic state enjoying peace and security, instead of being drawn toward an abyss from which there is no salvation.
I wonder what the founders of Israel, who were dreaming of a just, moral, progressive, and compassionate Jewish state, would say had they been able to witness the moral decadence of a so-called leader who is shattering their noble dream and putting Israel's very existence at risk.
Participants in a new viral video declare that kissing a stranger on camera is still "less strange than the [Arab-Israeli] conflict."
The following conversation between Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (Bibi) and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen) is fictitious.
The enduring impasse between Israel and the Palestinians in the peace negotiations and their changing internal political dynamics has made it impossible for them to resolve the conflict on their own.
After 47 years of occupation, the time has come for all decent Israelis to think about the future of their country. Where is Israel heading, and for how much longer can the occupation and the injustices continue without jeopardizing Israel's very existence?
The first weeks of Benjamin Netanyahu's new government show that such a proposal is timelier than ever. Barely sworn in, its statements, policy proposals and steps show that it might use its tenure, brief as it may be, to irreparably damage Israel's democracy.
The new Netanyahu-led government was created to serve its own political agenda, which is far removed from Israel's national interests. Indeed, in Israel the politician's personal interest comes first, the interest of the political party comes second, favoritism comes third, and the country can wait.
Conservatives believe that Israel's Likud defeated the liberal Zionist Union. But the evidence shows that's not the case. Benjamin Netanyahu was able to pick up 12 more seats, almost entirely at the expense of other conservative parties, with a shift to the right.