nagorno-karabakh

The pact calls for territorial concessions and the deployment of nearly 2,000 Russian peacekeepers to the area where full-scale fighting began Sept. 27.
By Christopher Atamian and Haykaram Nahapetyan Aleksander Lapshin holding up his three passports. Who’s out there? A bewildered
Since the 2014 Russian annexation of Crimea, Western policymakers have worked earnestly to prevent Russian President Vladimir Putin from instigating new military campaigns in Eastern Europe and the post-Soviet region.
As the wheels turn in Washington, our ally Georgia continues to require our friendship and assistance. The U.S. should cherish
April 24 marked 101 years since the start of the Armenian genocide, when Ottoman Turks killed approximately 1.5 million Armenians, Assyrians, Greeks, and others.
The fighting in Nagorno-Karabakh is like a chronic affliction that simmers down but never really stops. Escalations in the level of hostilities regularly arrive with melt-offs of the mountain snow. However, the eruption that began on April 2nd has flared up to levels unseen since the 1990s.
Violent conflict erupted in Nagorno-Karabakh (NK) on April 2, killing hundreds. Azerbaijan violated a cease-fire that had been in place since 1994. The situation remains extremely volatile, despite a temporary truce.
Dozens have been killed in a recent flare up in fighting over the region.
President Vladimir Putin urged the warring sides to immediately observe the 1994 ceasefire.
Armenia and Azerbaijan, who are in a state of war despite a ceasefire, have three options on how to approach the stalemated conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh, a dispute that lasted more than two decades.