nanny state

Today, the "nanny-state" is omnipresent. Its latest pernicious intrusion pertains to pain relief medication. Doctors are being told to restrict their prescriptions of opioids, the drugs (such as Percocet and Vicodin) used to reduce extreme pain. Why? Because the government is concerned about patients who overuse the drugs, leading to addiction and sometimes death.
There's a pretty high likelihood that, at some point in their lives, my daughters will be sexually active. When that day comes, I couldn't live with myself if I had done anything to increase the risk that they'll die from it. That may not be the way some parents think of their actions, but that is the reality.
Apparently, caring about kids' health is another position that just won't fly in an election year.
The payday loan is not, as GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson recently wrote, a "short-term loan secured by their next paycheck with an interest rate around 15 percent." Payday loans, which few borrowers pay off the following week, actually end up with interest rates above 300 percent.
No cupcake-related "rules or guidelines" were in fact "abolished" by the Texas Department of Agriculture, which oversees our state's child nutrition programs, but Miller likely cares little about the specifics.
Restaurants and bars in Lubbock, Texas have become the most recent target of anti-smoking zealots pushing their prohibitionist agenda. These activists fail to appreciate how respecting the freedom of property owners to determine their own policy, coupled with market forces, already achieves efficient regulation.
Having allowed the government to expand and exceed our reach, we find ourselves on the losing end of a tug-of-war over control of our country and our lives.
For that reason alone, hail to the Nanny State from all the non-smokers who don't want to be innocent victims of someone
It's a charming and moving little film, starring Dame Judi Dench and Steve Coogan. It tells the true story of an Irish woman who, as a teen, became pregnant and was forced into the Magdalene Sisters' care.
Born at the dawn of the Reagan era, Millennials were the first generation to be fully subjected to the all-out assault of the idea that we take care of each other in this country. Some of us are the parents of Millenials, and we wonder: who will fight with them, and for them?
As the mayoral candidates begin posturing for the fall campaign, none of them has made nanny-state solutions to today's problems a part of his or her campaign. So the days of Bloomberg's nanny state are numbered. This may save the Styrofoam cup after all.
The soda ban was an imperfect beginning, surely, but it was a beginning. It was not going to end our sugar addiction any more than making bars smoke-free was going to get the city to en masse kick the smoking habit. It was a one small factor in a complex equation.
Did the Bloomberg proposal have faults? You bet. Did it have loopholes? Sure. Would it present an enforcement nightmare? Probably, although not nearly as bad as critics have suggested. But that does that mean we sit back and do nothing?
All New York City's public hospitals will adopt new guidelines that forbid emergency room doctors to give out more than three
Mark Bittman, a writer for the New York Times, is proposing a new way to label foods so that all consumers need to do is take a quick glance at the package to make an informed decision about their health.
Now that the New York City Board of Health has ratified Mayor Bloomberg's plan to ban sugar-sweetened beverages (well, some such beverages, really) larger than 16 oz., we should be able to answer the question: Is this a big deal?
In an effort to curb obesity in New York City, the Board of Health officially approved Mayor Bloomberg's plan to ban the