nathan winograd

The "adopt some and kill the rest" paradigm which has dominated our nation's shelters for so long is being replaced. But what is it being replaced with? In other words, what does "No Kill" mean? And when does a shelter or community truly achieve it?
It would be an egregious error and we would be seriously remiss if we didn't honor that non-human animals, similar to us, want the pain to end right now.
If a pound is going to kill community dogs, if rescuers are not going to find them homes, if robust transfer programs are not in place to get those dogs to a community where they could find homes, they, like the dogs in the Dominican Republic and cats in the U.S., should realize all the other benefits that would come of sterilization.
There is no such thing as an animal who is irremediably psychologically or behaviorally suffering. There is no such thing as an animal who is so traumatized that he wants to die.
"We wanted to hold PETA accountable for what they did to Maya and the Zarate family."
PETA recently filed a lawsuit that is egregiously antithetical to the cause of animals rights; it is a case that so tragically captures the rot that is at the very heart of PETA's corrupted mission that I cannot let this opportunity to highlight their hypocrisy go unchallenged.
"PETA's animal shelter has always operated to find adoptive homes and will continue to do so as stated in Senate Bill 1381
Private animal shelters are now defined under Virginia law as "a facility that is used to house or contain animals and that
PETA's kill statistics for 2014 are now available. They're even uglier than last year's. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is once again poisoning over 88% of the dogs and cats entrusted to their care.
If California Assembly Member Mike Gatto has his way, cats who enter shelters without identification will be immediately taken from their families and given to for-profit companies, including potentially, companies who sell animals to research labs.