National Academy Of Sciences

The report by the National Academy of Sciences committee did not name a source for the energy in Cuba and China or say that it was the result of an attack.
There's been a long-running war over potatoes in federal programs.
Stephen Hawking is among those who say the GOP nominee could prove disastrous for the planet.
The Zika threat is causing great concern at the Rio Olympics, with some athletes having chosen to avoid the Games altogether rather than risk infection. But among the measures being taken around the world to combat this danger, one is notably absent: the use of DDT.
Congress is currently considering expanding the U.S. national missile defense system, despite the fact that -- nearly 15 years after the Bush administration began deploying it -- it has not been demonstrated to work under real-world conditions and is not on a path to do so.
The expert panel has posted its report online, along with the evidence they rely on, in the hope that their massive meta-analysis might inform public thinking about the issue. The sad thing is, given the nature of human risk perception, minds already made up on the issue are unlikely to change.
"The evidence speaks for itself ... with all the science surrounding climate change, it's not a secret and certainly not a debate. It is, most importantly, a time for action. We've been stalling for too long," said Marcia McNutt, the incoming president of the National Academy of Sciences.
Congress last month extended valuable tax credits to producers of electricity from wind turbines and solar photovoltaic panels, a move that came as a relief to an industry that has experienced rapid growth in recent years.
The ACC has been doing a lot more than just posting disinformation on the Internet. Along with Koch Industries -- owner of Georgia-Pacific, one of the largest U.S. formaldehyde and plywood manufacturers -- it has been currying favor on Capitol Hill with large sums of lobbying and campaign cash.
In this presidential election season, one thing is certain: candidates will rarely - if ever - be asked what they would do to keep this nation at the forefront of science and innovation. That's a shame.