National Intelligence Agency

The move contradicts the military’s own assessments going back to 1990.
Russia and the U.S. return to a “normal” state of icy hostility, a top analyst writes. Ousting Assad would lead to “brutal civil conflict,” a former CIA operative says.
In 11 years, the first nuclear weapon since 1945 will be used in a conflict and China and America will defuse the crisis.
Since 9/11, expansion has been the name of its game, as the leading intelligence agencies gained ever more power, prestige, and the big bucks, while wrapping themselves in an unprecedented blanket of secrecy.
Concern over the small European nation's ability to handle its worsening Islamic militant threat came to the fore following Tuesday's ISIS attack.
The U.S. is once again in the midst of an inward turn. Unlike the disconnection following the First World War, America's growing national deficit in the capacity and will to engage other people not like them is not the innocent confidence of a rising power but the false bravado leading one to its fall.
While there is nothing new about espionage or hacking, the size and depth of these attacks make them extremely serious. The ubiquity of technology and poor security have caused both crime and surveillance to skyrocket in frequency and specificity.
While we, the citizens of the U.S., remain in legal America, the U.S. national security state exists in "post-legal America" because no illegal act from warrantless surveillance to torture committed in its service will ever be prosecuted.
Obama ordered a declassified report be prepared for public release before any military strike commences. That report, top
Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), a fervent opponent of the National Security Agency's surveillance program, admitted that he considered leaking the program in an interview with Rolling Stone published on Thursday.
"Congress must conduct rigourous oversight to ensure that all incidents of non-compliance are reported to the oversight committees
The NIC report indicates that we're rapidly moving towards a quadripartite world governed by the U.S., China, India, and the European Community. In such a world, it makes no sense for America to shoulder most of the responsibility for policing the world.
The future is arriving faster than expected. According to a report by the National Intelligence Council, Global Trends 2030, 17 years from now the world will be remarkably different. How does America plan to deal with this change?
Global growth will likely increase the demand for food, water, and energy by 35, 40, and 50 percent, respectively, by 2030. Add continued climate change to the equation, and the struggle for resources only becomes more intense.
I asked Col. Mykleby about issues facing President Obama in his second term. The resulting interview is long but well worth reading. It offers a fresh approach to national security from someone who has served at the highest levels of the U.S. military. I'll post it in two parts.
Every few years the National Intelligence Council has produced a document it calls serially Global Trends [fill in the future year]. The latest edition, out just in time for Barack Obama's second term, is Global Trends 2030.
As we look at prognostications about the economy and politics of 2030, is it possible that the axis of global culture is also moving to other places, or at least will be more evenly distributed in the decades to come?