national suicide prevention month

Please, don't leave us. We need you. Won't you please stop listening to all of the lies that your depression is telling you
For me, especially, seeing fatal self-harm discussed purely as a disturbing wall of figures is disheartening, perhaps because I know I am among those statistics, as a survivor, and that I could have been as a casualty.
In the environmental movement they call it greenwashing: A big polluter plants a few trees in the rainforest in hopes that they can get some good publicity they can leverage for their next bad move. It's a sham and everyone knows it.
In boxing, one of the fundamental necessities of the sport is the presence of a good cornerman. In an article written a few years ago providing insight into and describing the sine qua non of the cornerman, the author declared, "he [the cornerman] must be a psychologist, able to assist the fighter through the emotional minefield that is the preparation for combat.
I almost didn't make it for one of the greatest eras of my life. Right at this very moment, no career has been more rewarding, new friendships have never been so promising, and most importantly: I love someone more fiercely, more openly and honestly than I ever have before. And it almost never happened.
I learned that what one person considers selfish, another considers selfless. For some, they believe themselves such a strenuous burden on others that their absence from this world is considered a gift. And to others, that very absence is seen as a egocentric answer to problems usually unseen.
Last year the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention set a bold goal to reduce the annual suicide rate in the United States 20 percent by 2025. That's potentially tens of thousands of lives we can save over the next ten years. A new poll we released for National Suicide Prevention Week shows we're off to a good start.
This month marked a major milestone for suicide prevention when the Golden Gate Bridge board of directors approved the first funding toward construction of a suicide barrier on the San Francisco landmark.
Mental health is not having a problem. It's how you address all of the challenges in your life. It's how you handle stress, break-ups, rejection, lack of sleep, loss and everything else. We need a clear definition of mental health as a baseline.
Dr. Sederer explained that anyone can ask the simple words, “Are you OK?” if they are concerned about a friend or loved one
Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. “We need the entire system to step
Depression is a disease, not a weakness, and suicide is its tragic consequence. By taking a few simple steps, primary care providers can better identify depression and ensure that patients receive needed treatment.
Suicide is never an easy thing to talk about, to prevent, or to understand. But recognizing the risk factors is an important step. During this year's observance of Suicide Prevention Month, we should work to draw more attention to the link between suicide and alcohol, in all its facets.
During the spring semester of 2002, while I was teaching my creative-writing class at Sheepshead Bay High School in Brooklyn, a student finally shared and read aloud a poem that he had just written. And after he read, our jaws dropped with amazement, our eyes widened with shock, our brows curled with concern, our hearts stopped with empathy, and our bodies froze with fear.
What can you do to prevent suicide? You can read about the warning signs for suicide and how to help someone. Another thing you can do is make a 15- to 30-second video, like the one included here.
According to the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) http://iasp.info the following 10 things are true
For many years, the prevailing culture among first responders, and members of the military and Veterans, has been stoicism. Whatever it was you'd gone through you'd better deal with quietly, deal with it alone and get back to work.
Sometimes, something as simple as talking to a Veteran can help them open the door and rediscover what matters most in their life. Whether the Veteran you know has just returned home, or they served years ago, you can be there to support them and help them remember what matters.
Aiding our men and women in uniform has always been integral to the American Red Cross' mission. Today, the American Red Cross' professional, compassionate team staffs an Emergency Communications Center dedicated to the military community.