National Women's Hall of Fame

Health insurance. Obesity. Decoding the human genome. Cholesterol. Diet. We have so many medical concerns in the 21st century
Although we may not each have Wonder Woman’s superpowers, we each possess the ability to change the world. Each of the women
After my recent visit to the Saint Marianne Cope Shrine and Museum in Syracuse, New York, I began to wonder about women with ties to Hawaii. Saint Cope's ties to that State were very significant.
Hurricane season is approaching (June 1-November 30)! I remember growing up in Virginia at a time when every hurricane was named for a woman. I thought it would be fun to use the names of some significant hurricanes matched to a significant woman from U.S. history with the same first name.
Human rights and civil rights activist Ella Baker formed many of her opinions as she grew up listening to her grandmother
____ 1. Her school, established in 1904 in Daytona Beach, Florida with $1.50 is today a coeducational university that carries
As a member of the Advisory Committee for Women on 20s, I was delighted to hear the announcement that Harriet Tubman will be the face of the $20 bill.
On May 7, the inaugural Women's Right to Run 19k will be held in Seneca Falls, New York, the birthplace of women's rights.
I am preparing for a series of speaking engagements at the University of Utah and began to wonder about she-roes from the Beehive State. As with women from every other state, women with ties to Utah have made significant contributions to U.S. history and culture.
As I drove through New Mexico on my way to and from Los Alamos, I savored the landscape and pondered "The Land of Enchantment." As with women from every other state, women with ties to New Mexico have made significant contributions to U.S. history and culture.
I am reminded many times in my research that women are invisible throughout history. While preparing a recent presentation for the women's auxiliary of the Knights of Columbus, I discovered two American women Roman Catholic saints of whom I was not aware.
As I plan a trip for Europe this coming summer with a friend, I see how much fun "adventuring" can be. Of course, I am no match for women who have scaled mountains or traveled to the, literally, ends of the Earth.
There I was with a glass of wine in one hand and a paint brush in the other. As I created a real painting on the canvas, I marveled as I thought this was a talent I did not possess.
Mattel recently announced that Barbie would now come in three body types. The doll that comes in different skin tones will now come in different body types as well. The doll that millions of girls have played with for over 50 years was invented by a woman. Women throughout U.S. history have made significant contributions to both children's education and play. Match the woman with her accomplishment:
Those opportunities did not exist for me when I was coming through school, but they do now. Much of that credit goes to the enactment of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.
During the holiday season, many of us used our smartphones to take pictures and to show family members and friends pictures of events that had occurred during the past year.
As a second generation American, I am grateful for the opportunities with which I am blessed today. For this column, I decided to profile some women immigrants who contributed significantly to our country.
I often travel through the Chicago O'Hare airport which triggered thoughts about women from Illinois and their contributions through history.
____ 1. The first African-American woman elected to the Texas State Legislature. ____ 2. She organized pecan workers' strikes