Natural History

"Every time it swam by me, it would bump into me a little bit more."
When an iconic institution like the American Museum of Natural History has ties to fossil fuels, the contradiction is self
Until now, known viruses have contained so little genetic information that people have questioned whether they can even be thought of as living. But giant viruses like this one contain as much information as many bacteria, which are certainly alive, and are so big they can be seen with an ordinary microscope.
In Wild Kingdom, Campbell shows that as individuals, our dependency on technology blinds us to precipices and predators, to each other. We are living vicariously when we look at a diorama; we live vicariously -- and allow others to live vicariously -- through social media.
Traditionally humans are considered to be the ultimate destroyers of the planet. However, EARTH: A New Wild, challenges this premise and illustrates how humans are essential to the earth's survival.
"I find that once I feel like I've got something captured, it frees me up to try newer things -- different types of photos that might express movement or that evoke the space."
About 5 million years ago, sea levels were 296 feet (90 m) higher than today, and the low-lying South Africa became a patchwork
Great dioramas are really a form of theater, telling you a visual story that can be amplified, but never replaced, by text or voice. They force your imagination to work, so that missing dimensions like movement and the elapse of time are provided instead by the mind's eye.
This part of Colorado, a friend tells me, "is like a magical kingdom."
The museum is seeking gold-level LEED certification for the building, which would make it one of just 18 such environmentally