negative reviews

You're not going to satisfy everyone, and on some occasions, the customer isn't right, but you should certainly do your darndest to try and find common ground, and head off problems at the pass, without compromising your basic business needs.
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Is the literary community really missing out on anything, now that the clever punchline of this review has been omitted? Comments like this aren't cultural conversations. They're self-satisfied monologues.
Negative reviews from unhappy customers, peeved ex-employees or close competitors are a challenge for local businesses, legitimate or not.
It's no secret that in the world of online product reviews, you have to weed out the fakers. This is especially true for books, as publishers have long been paying for users to produce a glowing write-up about something they've never read.
When I starting telling people I was going to have a book published, one of the most frequent questions I received was: "What name are you going to publish under?" The funny thing is, it had never even occurred to me to publish under any other name but my own.
It seems like there's a lot of ink being spilled recently about book reviews, so let me spill a little more.
Reviews found on such websites as Yelp, Google Places and Citysearch can make or break a local business.
Bill Morris at The Millions drew our attention to this Marketing Science research paper that explores the impact of negative
This year has seen its fair share of authors kicking off about poor reviews, from Alice Hoffman, who called a Boston Globe