Neo-fascism

Jewish groups have condemned the proposal for "winking at neo-fascism."
While I do expect him to have some clever moves ahead, since he is obviously a very shrewd guy, my worry is that he will
"We won't see a presidential candidate like Bernie again in our lifetimes." As I heard these words, spoken by a woman at a Sanders campaign event recently, I felt a chill go through me. Because I knew she was right. We won't.
If those establishment Republicans who really do want to stop Donald Trump also want to beat Hillary Clinton, their options have narrowed to just about one.
The constant media frame for the shocking-to-many success of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders is that both campaigns represent the rejection of elites in favor of populism, albeit contradictory populisms of the right and left. Would that it were so simplistic.
Paradoxically, Hillary is at once at risk of losing the general election to a rampaging Trumpist populism and in reach of winning a smashing victory.
With billionaire bully boy Donald Trump arrogantly flashing his fascist colors on Super Tuesday, how many supposedly big-time Republicans have spoken out against his disgusting politics of racism, hatred, and aggressive know-nothingism? Too damn few.
Such a story is raising hope among activists and progressive Catholics, many of whom have left the church behind but still recognize its potential power as a source for good in many parts of the world.
Members of Europe's far-right parties can look to the great Muslim leaders for guidance in how to treat Muslims in their societies.