netroots nation

Activists are furious that she has publicly criticized progressive members of the House Democratic Caucus.
Tom Steyer’s campaign did not exactly take Netroots Nation by storm.
"Those are things that dictators have said," the New Jersey senator said.
Members of the “Black Ass Caucus” were disappointed in how Netroots Nation treated black conference-goers and panelists.
There has been less attention -- especially in the LGBT community -- to protected non-visible disabilities such as epilepsy, depression, alcoholism, anxiety disorder, dyslexia, attention deficit disorder and post traumatic stress syndrome.
This year's Netroots Nation felt like one long lightbulb joke.
As African-Americans and citizens of a country that values political participation, this country is always asking for political engagement from blacks but if it's not in the manner deemed appropriate, we are asked to sit down and be silent.
To white Americans who are uncomfortable, I say: welcome to our world. You may be uncomfortable for a while until we make America a truly fair and racially just society.
“We need white candidates talking to white people about the Movement for Black Lives.”
Rather than simply asking for black votes in October 2016 after having taken them for granted up to that point, Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders will possess the credibility that comes with having earned those votes. At that point -- if not a lot earlier -- the Democratic Party and its nominee will need to thank #BlackLivesMatter.
Sen. Sanders, there is one issue that you must progress greatly on if you wish to become the president that America needs in 2016. That issue is racial justice. Saying that racism exists in your next speech or adding #blacklivesmatter to the end of your next tweet is not enough.
Two weeks ago, we kind of went out on a limb (the polling evidence was not all that clear when we wrote it) and subtitled our previous column: "Donald Trump, Frontrunner." Since that time, such a statement has gone from being a wild prediction to becoming an equally-wild reality.
This past week I was at the Netroots Nation 2015 conference. In the past, this has been one of my favorite progressive events, full of both energy and positivity. This year the theme was intersectionality within the LGBT movement. I am forced to report that we are failing at it. Horribly.
Audre Lorde's speech "Lesbian and Literature Panel" highlighted something I'd been considering for some time; the need to continually break my silence and give voice to the issues I am most passionate about: racial injustice and the marginalization of people of color.
Bernie Sanders, to put this another way, doesn't need a focus group or a poll to tell him what he ought to stand for. He already knows what he stands for, and he'll freely tell you exactly what that is.
When I read the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, I do think of Mike Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice. I also think of Penny Proud, London Chanel and Candra Keels. But I also think of Andre and the two other young queer people of color who been murdered in Pittsburgh in the past two years.
For the Netroots Nation convention, the most notable thing was that two Democratic candidates for president showed up, and three did not. Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley were both on hand to court Lefties, but I had to wonder where Hillary Clinton was.