neurodiversity

A recent altercation I had with a flight attendant exemplified just how little most people understand about neurological diversity.
To me, being “openly autistic” means not having to hide or mask my autism; it is the freedom to be exactly who I am.
Deaf gain, rather than hearing loss, has long been theorized in capital-D-Deaf cultural spaces. Borrowing liberally from this "reframing," I wish to forward a perspective that I call "mad advantage."
To mark National Autism Awareness Month in April, we spoke to people with autism and their families to find out what autism means to them
As I take a little time out now as World Autism Awareness Day rolls around again and look back at the year in autism, both around the world and in my own home, I'm trying not worry.
Typical public concert venues are inaccessible to those who are unable to sit still and be quiet. Experiencing live music in the fine arts is totally elusive to the growing number of people in our society on the autism spectrum. This is not okay.
It's one thing deciding to tell strangers your child has autism or some other "invisible" disability, but when is the right time to tell your child?
She is both crushingly disabled by autism and absolutely, emphatically her own self. She is a gift, that much is true. But her autism, like my missing fingers or my damaged DNA, is not.
Sesame Street is really good at promoting diversity. The reason my friends are upset is not that Sesame Street wants to focus on autism -- it is that Autism Speaks is involved. And I think they have a point.
I'm not encouraging my children to ignore difference or to pretend they don't see it. Instead, I'm praying that they will.
Understanding autism cultural competency includes making compassionate accommodations when and where possible in consideration of someone's sensory sensitivities. This requires not only awareness but compromise.
Like Andy Warhol's paintings? He probably had Asperger's. I could almost see the utterly palpable weight sift off of the
A year ago, I found Julia Bascom's blog, and it changed my life. Within the last year, Julia created the video "The Loud Hands Project." This video, together with Julia's blog, is mandatory viewing for any and all who are even remotely interested in autism or know someone on the spectrum.
It's April 2021. Still riding high two months after her inauguration, the first female President of the United States (do I even need to mention her name?) turns her attention to the upcoming Autism Acceptance Month.
Scientific research into the causes of autism will continue, and the best of that research will help us better understand autism. But we need to balance research with investments that can improve the lives of autistic people now.
My conclusions may surprise you, especially if you've grown used to hearing autism described as a soul-stealing prison that plunges families into unending misery.
We each have our own truths. Our beliefs may be different, but our goals are the same: a happy, healthy, love-filled and productive life -- as independent and self-determined as possible.
We're not a legal minority, we have no flag (we're typically incapable of marches anyway) and there are no social movements lobbying exclusively for our deferred American Dream.
Amy, a 22-year-old with a spinal cord injury, is caught in a vicious catch-22. If she goes to work, she will lose the assistance that makes it possible for her to work and live independently in the first place.