new sat

The College Board's 2014 announcement that there would be a complete overhaul of the SAT sent many people into a tizzy; and the time has finally come for students to meet the new test. With these five tips in mind, you are bound to get the most out of your standardized testing.
Many students are asking the question should I take the current SAT or the ACT or take the New SAT which will be offered in March 2016. Some things you should know about the current ACT and New SAT both of which are quite similar.
The new SAT is not a bad test, but it is not yet polished. Given its numerous similarities to the ACT, therefore, students currently heading into their junior years will find the ACT a more reliable option for prep work.
"At the end of the day, it's recognition that test preparation is really important," Seppy Basili, vice president of college
While much is being made of the 2016 SAT, ACT, inc. -- an SAT competitor that now comprises more than 50 percent of the standardized college entrance exam market -- is quietly making changes, or "enhancements," as the company calls them.
There is a perception that we don't yet know much about the redesigned SAT. This notion persists because the College Board has chosen to release information in a less than straightforward manner, burying hard fact within vague jargon about measures of "college readiness."
In recent years, test prep for the SAT or ACT and its place in the college admissions process has come under scrutiny. It's no secret that standardized test scores aren't the end-all predictor of college success.
I will be taking the SATs in June and have prepared for months taking numerous practice tests, which still will not guarantee how well I will do. It seems like the questions on both the SAT and ACT get more and more outrageous every year.
The new test will have two sections: math and evidence-based reading. The reading section will be based on previously published
The redesign of the SAT is a new concept for everyone. The general consensus is that the SAT is becoming easier and less agonizing. But it may be too easy.
The College Board made waves Wednesday when it announced the most substantial SAT revisions since 2005. The overhaul marks
Surprising no one in the test preparation industry, College Board's newly-released details on the revised SAT reveal the significant impact the Common Core Standards will have on one major college admissions test. Here's what you need to know.
The updated SAT is better tailored to measure students' capabilities and therefore presents colleges with an improved metric for student success.
This week's news about changes to the SAT format that will take place in 2016 reminded me of my own SAT experience just a few years ago. The Critical Reading and Sentence Completion sections were up first, and I was surprised that I actually did okay. Then came the math section.
The venerable SAT college admissions test will look very different in spring 2016. And, according to the new test's architect, there will be "no more mysteries."
A few states, including Texas, are not implementing the Common Core. But the revamped SAT nevertheless will be relevant, according