new silk road

Beijing is reviving the ancient Silk Road routes and claiming the South China Sea like America once claimed the Caribbean.
While China barrels ahead building a new Silk Road for the 21st century, abandoned zones in the West reach a dead end.
And it may fit into a much broader foreign policy strategy than you may think.
While the passions of internal discord have stalled the once-confident global march of the West, the East, led by China, is looking ahead with a decades-long strategy to revive the ancient Silk Road through Eurasia as the core of the world's economy and civilization. As Oxford historian Peter Frankopan, author of "The Silk Roads: A New History of the World," writes: "The age of the West is all but at an end when it comes to taking the lead and planning for the future." (continued)
The complex but irreversible integration of the European continent and the renaissance of the Chinese civilization arguably constitute the most significant factors of change of our time, the wise articulation of these two processes can only be mutually enriching and a source of growth and stability for our global village.
SINGAPORE -- By developing more arteries for connectivity, we should be able to build new blood vessels of development for disadvantaged economies in Asia's hinterlands to create prosperity and opportunities and improve the competitiveness of the whole region.
LONDON -- Eurasia is an idea whose time, it is said, has come around again. Recent historical research has rescued the old Silk Road from historical oblivion. The late American sociologist Janet Abu-Lughod identified eight overlapping "circuits of trade" between northwest Europe and China that, under the aegis of a Pax Mongolica, flourished between the 13th and 14th centuries.
Generally non-confrontational, ready for paradigm change and fundamentally non-ideological, China, which has regained centrality, is increasingly at the source of initiatives shaping the global agenda.
Far from being an empty rhetorical effect, Xi Jinping's New Silk Road will not only be one of the most discussed topics of 2015, but it will profoundly mark China's coming decade and reshape Eurasia.
The United States sees a South Asia with unlimited potential, not only to dramatically increase trade within the region but to also reach out to regional neighbors in Central and Southeast Asia.