New York Gay Marriage

As it turns out, it was the second time down the aisle for the couple. In June, Rivers agreed to marry Ryan and Aiello on
On the third anniversary of New York's landmark law, it is clear that the arc of history has bent toward recognizing and legalizing loving, committed relationships between couples, regardless of their sex. But there is much more to be done. How can we best change the hearts and minds of those most violently opposed to our equal rights?
Kennedy argued that support for marriage equality is fundamentally conservative, and the Republican voters he meets with
On May 19, 54 Below will also host a reception for the winners of the American Civil Liberties Union's "My Big Gay (Il)legal
Sam and I needed to find out how to change our names. The tedious process had nothing at all to do with gay marriage. Had either one of us chosen to take the other's last name, the process would have been easy.
All 90 lbs. of my cousin Lisa is willing to travel across the country to New York, a state where her union to Therese, her partner of 15 years, will be acknowledged. But what about the people who don't have the means make their last dying wish -- a legally recognized wedding -- come true?
What a difference two years can make. On Sunday, July 24, 2011, I was one half of a same-sex couple making history in New York by legally tying the knot. Fast-forward 24 months: I'm not planning our anniversary getaway; I'm preparing for our divorce.
We had intended to be somewhat tongue-in-cheek about our marriage. In the hours leading up to the "I do," we kept trying the word "wife" on for size, and then guffawing at the absurdity of how it sounded. But before we knew it, romance had crept in.
They believe that their grandson has a right to his 70 years. But with each day that my husband and I are denied the immediate comprehension and understanding that the word "marriage" provides, it's unlikely that we'll be able to break their record.