nimh

The nature/nurture debate on the causes of mental disorder generates no end of silly controversy by proponents on both sides.
The competition between psychotherapy and medication is pure David vs. Goliath. The drug industry is one if the most powerful and profitable, with billions to spend, able to push product aggressively with unscrupulous marketing.
Over a five year period, Healing Voices follows Oryx, Jen, and Dan, all previously diagnosed with serious mental illness
New evidence that early intervention can make a huge difference.
Today the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study officially gets underway, as the National Institutes of Health award 13 five-year grants to U.S. research institutions that will spearhead the landmark project over the first half of its roughly 10-year duration.
Eating disorders are not a choice. Eating disorders are a mental illness like Obsessive Compulsive Disorders, and they are treatable. I get a lot of flak for emphasizing the biological predisposition for eating disorders, for de-emphasizing the personal narrative, for banging on about "not your fault, not your parents' fault, not society's fault."
The mental health industry works very hard to convince government to throw money at "mental health" problems that are very broadly and loosely defined, instead of having a clear focus on delivering basic services to the seriously ill.
Liza Long is the mother of a son who has bipolar disorder. When her post-Newtown blog post "I Am Adam Lanza's Mother" went viral, she decided that she had to speak up for children like her son. Her goal is to expose the gaping cracks in our badly broken mental healthcare system.
Our fairly recent reliance on prisons and homelessness as solutions to mental illness was the common fashion 200 years ago but now seems anachronistic and indecent in a society that has the tools and can afford to do much better.
The horizon for breakthroughs in understanding mental disorders keeps drifting decades further into the future. The more we know, the more we know how little we know. It seems unlikely there will be any grand slam home runs or walks -- just singles and lots of strikeouts.
Recognition of mental illness as a profound public health problem that affects productivity and, therefore, a threat to the economy of nations; and that in a world where economies are rapidly becoming "brain-based."
Since NIMH began focusing on mental disorders as brain disorders nearly two decades ago, educating people about the brain has been a priority for us.
Rep. Murphy proposed the "Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis" Act to reorient the mental health system away from it's focus on serving the largest numbers of the highest functioning and back towards providing treatment for the most seriously mentally ill.
While I've never been convicted of a crime, I have spent my fair share of time in private mental hospitals, wherein I've witnessed what may well be our nation's last great bastion of tobacco, tar and nicotine.
NIMH director Insel now agrees with treatment reform activists that many people diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychoses could be better served by a more selective and limited use of drugs and more diverse treatments.
How many families have to be devastated by the impact of this disease before we make mental illness a priority in this country? One in four is sick. If it were influenza, it would be an epidemic.
This past month has been disastrous for mental health. One embarrassment has followed another -- leading to a crisis of confidence that is potentially dangerous for those who rely on psychiatric care.
If DSM diagnosis doesn't inform treatment, what good is it? The answer is one, to facilitate the exchange of money between payers and providers, and two, to create silos for focused research. With the NIMH announcement, scratch number two.
May has been a dispiriting month for psychiatry and a sad and worrying time for our patients. Three of the leading mental health organizations have squabbled among themselves -- promoting silly and competing 'paradigm shifts' while ignoring the unmet needs of our patients.