nina davuluri

America is a melting pot of cultures -- but it seems like not all cultures and ethnicities are welcome. Unless, of course, their clothing is appropriated for profit or racial jokes are made at their expense for entertainment. It seems as if some Americans love everything about us... except us.
That's great advice from a fantastic role model, and just the thing to inspire dreams and success. We must continue providing
Before bullying can be severely curbed, it seems that parents, teachers and students must learn how to recognize it.
Apparently being American means being white and having a name everyone's familiar with.It means being comfortable with what you know and who you know. It means being fearful of the unknown. And it means not having dark skin.
Should being a teenager or simply existing "come with the job" of being bullied?
When you're a short man, life is sad. The days stretch endlessly towards a great void. We wonder whence we came, and where we are headed. In other words, with no sex to distract us from more meaningful pursuits, we become philosophers.
The most impressive thing to me about this 20 city anti-bullying symposium is that it came to fruition as a result of a 17-year-old girl speaking up and a multi-billion-dollar company listening.
Instead of dismissing Nina Davuluri because she participated in a beauty pageant, why not stand with her when she asserts a woman of color's right to be who she is and exist no matter what the context?
For a country that got rid of royalty on its road to independence it seems Americans could also now grasp the wisdom of doing away with the hierarchal idea of beauty queens as well. Can't we see the beauty in everyone and celebrate without any beauty king or queen being crowned among us?
The truth is that it's one thing to accept Indian-Americans or brown skin people in professional fields, like medicine, computer science, or finance. But when it come to ideas of beauty and national concepts of beauty, old habits die hard, if at all.