No Man's Land

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I walked into Broadway's Cort Theatre for a Thursday night performance of No Man's Land to see Sir Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian McKellen, icons of theater and nerd culture.
There's no one quite as original as Marina Abramovic, an artist who defies categorization and pushes the limits of what art can be and what the audience and performer can both endure.
The current Broadway revival at the Cort Theater of Waiting For Godot is never less than riveting. That's thanks to the extraordinary chemistry between Ian McKellen as Estragon and Patrick Stewart as a determined, upbeat Vladimir/Didi.
The pairing of No Man's Land with Godot is a stroke of genius, bringing the two masters of comedic and enigmatic incomprehension, Pinter and Beckett, to the stage in alternating performances that underscore the affinity between them.
In busy spells -- which in the Broadway arena typically include the two weeks before Thanksgiving and the month before the various award deadlines in the spring -- it is not uncommon for critics and award nominators to find themselves at five or six a week. Eighteen in 16, though, is overdoing it.
The authors mix bleak despair with comic patter, making the plays catnip for a certain caliber of star actor. Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart have joined together to offer the two plays.
Really, are there closer friends in the world than Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellan? The duo took a break from rehearsals