no more

A new study of the Latino community's views on domestic violence and sexual assault found that, as in surveys of the population as a whole, many believe Latino victims don't come forward because they fear losing their children or facing more violence.
WASHINGTON -- A new study of the Latino community's views on domestic violence and sexual assault found that, as in surveys
Over this past weekend, as millions of Americans gathered in their living rooms to watch the first round of games of this season's NFL playoffs, the organization No More continued to grab the national spotlight.
Bill Burr says "no more" to causes being attached to sports, but don't send your angry comments just yet. On Wednesday, the
Nearly 20 percent of college women experience sexual assault, but defenses like "she seems fine to me" and "she's too smart
Our tolerance for overlooking and excusing this violence never ceases to amaze me. While violence is complex, the basic issue, the right of children and women to live lives unmolested, is not. And it is rarely framed in terms of justice for girls and women within homes.
The perception that these are private affairs -- most incidents of domestic and sexual violence take place in the home or between intimate partners -- and therefore "none of our business" is perhaps the biggest deterrent to progress. These are attitudes that need to -- and can -- change.
A culture of consent is based on the rights of potential victims instead of on the rights of potential rapists.  Which would you prefer?