NOM

I thought I smelled a rat. Turns out six years later I was correct. NOM repeatedly broke Maine's election law, and its president Brian Brown lied about it all the way up to the United States Supreme Court.
The National Organization for Marriage has just published a new blog post in which the anti-gay group reveals its plans for 2016. Strangely enough, none of those plans include the most likely scenario: that the organization will cease to exist.
Well, it seemed like marriage was safe in Alabama, but the state Supreme Court still had a one weird trick up its sleeve. Even though a federal court ordered marriage to begin, the Alabama Supreme Court has now ordered it to stop.
In the bizarro election of 2014, where the anti-gay National Organization for Marriage backed pro-gay Democratic candidates to show the GOP that they will help defeat any Republican candidate who veers from the evangelical right's agenda, pro-gay hedge-fund billionaire Paul Singer helped the anti-gay GOP take control of the U.S. Senate.
"Hagan was the person who hand-picked the federal judge who invalidated the North Carolina marriage amendment without so
Frank Schubert said that if by chance marriage equality opponents lost at the high court, as pretty much happened yesterday, they would have to go the route they did with abortion after Roe v. Wade. They'd have to seek "incremental" wins, he said, as they did then, chipping away slowly at abortion rights.
A former National Organization for Marriage (NOM) official has predicted that same-sex marriage legislation will be in place
The action, of course, mirrors previous NOM efforts. In 2012, the group announced a "Dump Starbucks" campaign after Starbucks
2014-06-09-ScreenShot20140609at19.12small.jpgIn what's become a fairly regular phenomenon, multiple judges last week delivered setbacks to NOM.
The National Organization for Marriage's President Brian Brown announced Saturday that the former presidential candidate
2014-05-27-ScreenShot20140527at12.10.41PMsmall.pngIn both Oregon and Pennsylvania, NOM is showing signs of continuing attempts to overturn marriage equality. This is a clearly unwinnable strategy. In fact, it's mystifying why NOM is even expending resources on it.
2014-05-20-ScreenShot20140519at8.16.47PMsmall.pngIt's a vivid sign of the dwindling clout of the National Organization for Marriage (NOM): four major losses in the span of just a few days in Oregon.
A hearing on the commission's recommendations have been scheduled for May 28, and NOM promised to contest the findings. NOM
2014-04-28-afer2014428vidsmall.pngThere was a time that NOM was a leading national force in opposition to marriage equality, but those days are long gone, never to return. The latest case in point: Oregon, where NOM's last-minute attempt to stop equality floundered in front of a judge.
This year at CPAC there was no panel focused on the evils of gay marriage. NOM did have a small table in the basement of the hotel with the other exhibitors, though nothing as grand as the massive, expensive booths and tents of the gun-rights groups or the anti-tax activists.
While we're hopefully beating back this law in Arizona, with anti-gay forces claiming it's about religious freedom and not about discrimination, keep in mind that their goal is to see homosexuality criminalized and punished around the world.
Gay people in the U.S. can find comfort in knowing we are fast approaching equal rights in our country. The danger that international gay people face, however, is that our anti-gay activist losers are providing the rhetorical fuel to ignite more animus toward the LGBT community.