nones

Religion played a mighty role in pushing Donald Trump over the top and into the Presidency. One religious group in particular
Earlier this month the Public Religion Research Institute released new statistics that chronicle the demographic shifts in religious affiliation. The one group that has grown exponentially is the so-called "Nones," or religiously unaffiliated.
We all know the stats, but what's behind the numbers?
All these years, I've been listening to your questions more closely than you can possibly imagine. They are my questions, too. Like you, I have been asking them all my life.
Saturday, June 4, marked the "Second Coming" of the Reason Rally. Atheists, agnostics, humanists, freethinkers, and secularists from all over the country descended on our nation's capital to rally in support of reason over faith in government.
If you didn't catch a report from the Pew Research Center last month on what seems to be an important new trend in American religion, feel free to forgive yourself. We're not talking about it. We're not even arguing about it anymore.
If chimpanzees -- our nearest evolutionary relatives--are expressing an inherent primate religiosity with these stone gathering rituals, might it be the case that we share a genetic predisposition for religion?
Based on these trends, the future of religion in America probably isn't a church.
Tina Fey was definitely on to something when she called BS on those who respond to the question about whether or not they are a feminist with "I am a humanist."
The Freedom of Thought Report annually catalogs discrimination against nonreligious people on behalf the International Humanist