nones

When religious voters sacrifice their core values for Trump's guarantee about the future they may well be investing in a
Earlier this month the Public Religion Research Institute released new statistics that chronicle the demographic shifts in religious affiliation. The one group that has grown exponentially is the so-called "Nones," or religiously unaffiliated.
We all know the stats, but what's behind the numbers?
All these years, I've been listening to your questions more closely than you can possibly imagine. They are my questions, too. Like you, I have been asking them all my life.
Saturday, June 4, marked the "Second Coming" of the Reason Rally. Atheists, agnostics, humanists, freethinkers, and secularists from all over the country descended on our nation's capital to rally in support of reason over faith in government.
If you didn't catch a report from the Pew Research Center last month on what seems to be an important new trend in American religion, feel free to forgive yourself. We're not talking about it. We're not even arguing about it anymore.
If chimpanzees -- our nearest evolutionary relatives--are expressing an inherent primate religiosity with these stone gathering rituals, might it be the case that we share a genetic predisposition for religion?
Based on these trends, the future of religion in America probably isn't a church.
Tina Fey was definitely on to something when she called BS on those who respond to the question about whether or not they are a feminist with "I am a humanist."
We have to be vigilant in our efforts to prevent such laws from taking hold, and we ought to use our nation's considerable
Theological education is in crisis. By itself, that's not new news. What's newsworthy is exciting new progress on the problems that's now coming up with solutions -- real, viable solutions. Tinkering with the old structures isn't enough anymore.
"If today's church does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authenticity, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century."
The two billion Christians of the world and the several Christians still left in the United States do well to listen to the criticism which argues that they do not help seekers, being smugly satisfied with the incurious "finders" and "keepers."
Harper's new line of books is tailored toward spiritual explorers of all sorts.
I asked her if she lacked love at home. "Not at all," she replied. "I was absolutely loved. But I wanted more." But why Catholicism
Overall, I'd say this year has been a mixed bag for religion. But then again, I'd have to say that every year throughout human history religious acts and beliefs have brought both bad and good to communities of people across the globe. America in 2015 is no different.
I hope to explore the self-understanding I have gradually and painfully accumulated over the years, and what this has meant