nonproliferation

Nuclear policy was never meant to be boiled down to a tweet, and yet world leaders have recently been trying to do just that.
It seems that one reason North Korea has pressed so hard for direct contact with America is to counterbalance Beijing. During
While no one expects a similar conflict in East Asia, the various territorial disputes as well as North Korean provocations
North Korea's Kim Jong-un continues his confrontational course. After conducting his nation's fifth nuclear test, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter declared it to be a "direct challenge to the entire international community."
Washington long has told the rest of the world what to do. But the world usually pays little attention. When ignored, U.S. officials typically talk tougher and louder, with no better result. That describes American policy toward North Korea.
North Korea has completed its first Korean Workers' Party congress in 36 years. The ruling elite appeared to be getting along fine despite international sanctions. Washington needs to find a new approach toward the North.
Seven years ago in Prague, the President boldly put the pursuit of global zero at the top of his foreign policy agenda. It brought new energy to the decades-long struggle to end the nuclear threat, and held all the promise of being a defining moment for a historic presidency. Today, it is a promise unfulfilled.
Severely sanctioning North Korea appears to create enormous benefits for China's rivals but few advantages for China. Why would any rational leadership in Beijing go along with America Washington must make a compelling case to the PRC. The U.S. should begin by pointing out how unstable the current situation is, with an unpredictable, uncontrollable regime dedicated to creating a nuclear arsenal of undetermined size
Iranians recently voted for a new parliament as well as Assembly of Experts, tasked with choosing the successor to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Moderate reformers did well in both bodies, vindicating the Obama administration's decision to try diplomacy after years of confrontation.
Yet again Washington is only doing what it has done before. Unfortunately, the same policy will yield the same result as before. It is time to try something different.