nonviolent drug offenders

In recent years there's been a lot of talk about the need to reduce sentences for non-violent drug offenders, which is laudable. However, the focus on the actions of the individual obscures the fact that illegal industries necessarily and inevitably involve violence regardless of the intentions of the participants.
I'd heard that it's hard for those who have served time to find work, but I was confident because I thought I had the skills I needed to get my life back on track and become a productive member of my community. I had no idea that the job market is barricaded against people like me.
Humans of New York (HONY) just ended its powerful series inside federal prison, leaving some fans with questions. How do his profiles stack up against the broader federal prison population? And what can we each do to help fix the system?
We don't give Jim Webb enough credit. He started this whole criminal justice reform movement. If only we had given him more time.
Trying to identify those circumstances where an 18- to 25-year-old might fairly be treated as a juvenile, difficult though it may be, should be a priority for a modern society, particularly for non-violent offenders with a low outlook for recidivism.
Louisiana has the dubious honor of being the prison capitol of the world. More Louisianans spend their lives behind bars than any other state in the U.S. per capita. These draconian sentences for non-violent drug offenses only hurt Louisiana.
In early June, the ACLU commissioned a nationwide poll of registered voters who are likely to vote in the 2016 presidential election. The results, released Wednesday, demonstrate that we have arrived at a bipartisan moment where majorities of Americans no longer believe our criminal justice system serves the common good.
President Barack Obama announced Monday that he has granted dozens of federal inmates their freedom, as part of an effort to counteract draconian penalties handed out to nonviolent drug offenders in the past.
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Few people know what it feels like to arrest a man. To hear the click of the handcuffs that so ominously foretells the loss of freedom, citizenship rights and personal potential for years to come.
A piece in the Washington Post highlights the growing backlog of untested rape test kits that are sitting in police storage units while rapists run free and victims suffer. Missing from the story, however, is one of the biggest contributors to this backlog.
Faith communities fear that long sentences for drug offenses will negatively affect individuals, families and communities
It's time to end the United States' exceptionalism when it comes to incarcerating its citizens. A groundbreaking report released yesterday documents the unprecedented and costly price of U.S. incarceration rates.
My good friend and colleague, Anthony Papa, found his passion for art while serving a 15-to-life sentence in Sing-Sing. Papa painted hundreds of pieces while behind bars, but one of them stands out and is the most powerful painting I have ever seen.
Today the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee passed bipartisan sentencing reform legislation that reduces the federal prison population, decreases racial disparities, saves taxpayer money, and reunites nonviolent drug law offenders with their families sooner.
With a very heavy heart, as a mother and advocate for drug policy reform, I wish other mothers and fathers who are victims of the drug war a "happy" holidays -- but can one truly have a "happy" holidays when there's an empty chair at the family table?
I support and applaud President Obama's treatment of turkeys. But I have to ask the president: what about the treatment of the more than 100,000 people who are incarcerated in the federal system because of the war on drugs?
More commutations would also fatten up President Obama's rail-thin pardoning record of a mere 39 pardons and a single commutation -- the worst tally of any president in history.
Brown rejected the national 'smart on crime' trend and pragmatic public policy by vetoing SB649, which aimed to give judges and district attorneys the discretion to charge possession of small amounts of illicit drugs as a felony or a misdemeanor.