novelists

As the author of over fifty works of fiction, people have asked me why I don't concentrate my work and pursue a single genre. They point out that genre writers, especially those who specialize in serial genres, reap the greatest commercial rewards. They have a point and the evidence is clear.
At my present age of 92, the afflictions of aging assail me like the onslaught of an army bent on my destruction. Each week seems to bring a new, unwelcome impairment. My chest rents space to a pacemaker, and I have several stents in my arteries.
Though I've observed the phenomena for several decades now, it still surprises me that even bestselling novelists, even the ones who complain that no one has made a film from their books yet, don't write novels dramatic enough to lend themselves easily to mainstream film.
Current publishing trends are such that writers need to have an author platform before an agent or editor will sign them on. An agent friend of mine told an audience at a panel we sat on together, "Get the TED talk first and then come talk to me."
Johnny Cash was a brilliant musician. Singer. Performer. And masterful songwriter. Johnny Cash condensed high concept ideas into short, resonating stories -- ripping people's hearts in four or five stanzas -- that stayed in millions of ears and memories.