nsa obama

President Barack Obama met with 16 members of Congress for more than an hour at the White House on Thursday to discuss surveillance reforms, just days before he is to disclose changes he wants in response to leaker Edward Snowden's revelations.
"But he's not yet finished with that, and he is still soliciting input, which he did today," Carney added. Even after a report
On a day when President Obama met with congressional critics of NSA surveillance, a group of former NSA officials continued
Good old George can stop spinning in his grave. Yes, our most heroic general and inspiring president, who warned us in his farewell address "to guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism." It's an alert that's been ignored in the nation's hysterical reaction to the attacks of 9/11.
A second term of office for a president should be one that defines and seals an historical legacy, one in which a certain level of maturity and vision is achieved in the absence of the need to get reelected to office. Obama's second term is shaping up to be nothing more than a repeat of his lackluster, or half-assed, first four years in office.
A decade ago, Bush claimed that domestic spying posed no risk to civil liberties. The recent disclosure of the NSA's unchecked spying on Americans mock that claim. The ball is now in Obama's court to insure that the program doesn't trample on those liberties.
The scope of the NSA surveillance programs has raised concern among the public and some lawmakers. Last month, the House
How do we, as individuals and as a society make the difficult choices balancing privacy and security, sharing and oversharing, convenience and confidentiality?
Russ Tice, a former intelligence analyst who in 2005 blew the whistle on what he alleged was massive unconstitutional domestic spying across multiple agencies, claimed Wednesday that the NSA had ordered wiretaps on phones connected to then-Senate candidate Barack Obama in 2004.