Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty

  Suddenly it’s possible — indeed, all too easy — to imagine one man starting a nuclear war. What’s a little harder to imagine
On Monday, a quixotic and necessary conference kicked off at the United Nations.
Wakana Mukai, University of Tokyo Even though nuclear powers and countries that fall under their security umbrella are expected
President Trump: Like President Reagan, Make Us Safer Dear President Elect Trump: I urge you to take a look at the policies
Trump has asked, if we have nuclear weapons, why we would not use them, either ignoring or ignorant of the very serious threat to mankind's existence that stimulating a new global nuclear-arms race, much less use of nuclear weapons by the U.S., would bring.
The nuclear powers have not kept their part of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty bargain. While the US and Russia have dismantled many of their nuclear weapons since the end of the Cold War, they retain thousands of them, enough to destroy the world many times over.
Though "Make America Great Again" sounds good, it would be a more credible slogan from someone who showed a greater understanding of what has made America a great world power to begin with.
Most analysts agree that the sanctions represent the toughest and most comprehensive effort to date to punish the North Koreans for repeated nuclear tests that have violated previous resolutions issued by the council, which is expected to vote on the new sanctions in the coming days.
Hillary Clinton likes to extol her foreign policy credentials, particularly her experience as secretary of state. She attaches herself to Barack Obama's coattails, pledging to continue his policies. But she is even more hawkish than the president.
Here's the thing. This audacious lawsuit is a disarmament wedge. Since I wrote last week's column, I've been in touch with Laurie Ashton, the lead attorney for the case in U.S. federal court, and have read the brief appealing the suit's dismissal, which was filed last month. To get this close to the case -- to its language, to its soul -- is to feel possibility begin pulsing in a unique way.
The Marshall Islands lawsuits ask: If not us, who? If not now, when? These are the questions asked by those who have no choice. That means all of us should be asking them.
The recent announcement of a nuclear deal between the governments of Iran and other major nations, including the United States, naturally draws our attention to the history of international nuclear arms control and disarmament agreements.
Iran has won the diplomatic struggle over its nuclear program in Vienna. Its success was not due to United States negotiators' fecklessness as Republican critics and Prime Minister Netanyahu have been quick to assert.
There are compelling reasons for updating and tightening the Action Plan, most notably the need to halt nuclear weapons modernization, adopt metrics to gauge progress, and improve cooperation between parties.  
If war were only "itself" -- the violence and horror, the conflagration and death -- it would be bad enough, but it's also an abstraction, a specific language of self-justifying righteousness that allows proponents to contemplate unleashing it not merely in physical but in moral safety.