Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Opponents denounce the cost-cutting move as a threat to public safety.
One of the first times I used the phrase “institutional insanity” was in 1973 to describe the behavior of scientist Dixy
First and foremost, oil is the most urgent threat. The U.S. Coast Guard is keen to let the oil industry now use the river
An escalating series of problems began with an enhanced inspection of the interior of the Indian Point 2 reactor during a
For the past 23 years, Entergy engineers have tried unsuccessfully to ignore, live with, and then stop a radioactive rain from the Indian Point 2 reactor cavity from falling onto workers inside the massive containment building.
A special inspection of the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor found that more than a quarter of the stainless steel bolts needed to channel cooling water through active nuclear fuel rods were broken, distorted or "missing," a finding that calls into question the effectiveness of the long term management of this and other ageing power plants.
This week is the 5th anniversary of one of the worst disasters in the history of nuclear power. Unfortunately the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has not done enough to ensure that kind of an accident can't happen here.
At Byron, however, the single phase, Line C, was not monitored and, in fact, had broken and fallen to the ground between
For more than a decade, it has been impossible for operators of the Indian Point nuclear power plant to stop highly radioactive reactor and spent fuel pool coolant from leaking into the groundwater and migrating to the Hudson River.
We should do everything in our power to transition the bright minds at IPEC into the clean renewable energy sector in New York, which is growing daily. Let's keep them employed -- and then some. But most importantly, let's keep this country safe.
Yes, something big is going to happen in Paris: Those big polluting nations, China and India, but especially China, are going
If the NRC's cost-benefit analyses were more in line with other federal agencies' calculations, electric utilities would have to make their nuclear plants safer.
The nuclear power industry should be enjoying a boom, reveling in its extraordinary safety record and the fact that it is a carbon-free way to make electricity. But all is not well in atom land. In fact, things are dismal. Only five nuclear plants are under construction, and they are having birth pains as schedules slip and costs rise.
A very large gas pipeline will soon skirt the Indian Point Energy Center (IPEC), an aging nuclear power plant that stands in the town of Cortlandt in Westchester County, New York, 30 miles north of Manhattan. Experts say a disaster as great as or greater than Fukushima could be triggered by a potential gas explosion at the nuclear complex.
I was living my life within the confines of a teaching career. And at that moment I knew Kim had greatness in her soul. She
Last week marked the 10th anniversary of a federal reactor fire safety standard, but it's doubtful anyone at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) broke out the Champagne. That's because 35 reactors -- more than a third of the U.S. fleet -- still don't fully comply with it.
New York State is prepared to close 40 years of intermittent and costly legal wrangling over the annual destruction of billions of fish by the twin Indian Point nuclear power plants in the productive Hudson River estuary if the plant agrees to shut down during peak spawning and hatching seasons for the river's major fish populations.
From national administration to administration, corporations have run roughshod and those who are supposed to protect us from the danger and death these industries cause have regularly not done their jobs.