obama syria chemical weapons

"Superficially, Assad said many of the right things, appearing conciliatory and eager to involve Western governments in his
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Syrian President Bashar al-Assad are following a formula in which the common denominator is to embarrass the United States, Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) said Sunday.
"Basically since Yalta we've had an assumption that borders are basically going to be borders, and once that comes into question
Obama's indecision and political inclinations reinforced the status quo inside Syria -- terror, bloodshed and the prospect of endless war. If you're Assad and you are willing to employ any means to cling to power, Obama has effectively demonstrated that you can carry on while ignoring the rhetorical threats of outside intervention.
The thing you need to remember is that these critics are not taking, and will not defend, any position. Like I said, it's
Let us now praise common sense. Once again a president was about to plunge us into the darkest waters of foreign policy where the ruling principle becomes: "When in doubt, bomb someone."
In a statement released by the White House Saturday, Obama called the deal an "opportunity" to eliminate Syria's chemical
In my view, Barack Obama's speech on Syria this week was the high point of his presidency. Ultimately it could cement his place in history the way President Kennedy's courage and resolve during the Cuban missile crisis did for him.
The appeal to American credibility as a reason for striking was always weak and with dwindling support behind military intervention the argument has been exposed as vacuous.
A war crime is committed by an evil regime. That does not justify other nations to commit further war crimes in response. Not even well-intended nations. Not even the United States. The first step to stopping war crimes is for good countries to stop committing war crimes.