obstetrics

Ob/Gyn Amanda Hess was ready to deliver her own baby when a fellow mom-to-be
It is important for older women who are still at risk for unintended pregnancy to understand that birth control methods they
"Making mistakes humbles you and allows you to learn," Dr. Patricia Rekawek advises the residents as she addresses the Mount Sinai Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science on graduation night.
In 2015, some 303,000 women died from childbirth or pregnancy-related complications. Yet that figure, disturbing as it is, is dwarfed by the number of young mothers who suffer injury, infection and disease after giving birth.
When I was pregnant with my first child 17 years ago, I had the usual worries compounded by my knowledge as an obstetrician and high-risk pregnancy specialist. I knew first-hand the impact of prematurity and other complications. Like other moms-to-be, I hoped to deliver a healthy baby. As a research physician, I was eager for evidence-based knowledge to make this a reality.
I still recall my first job. I felt like an impostor in my uniform. I didn't feel like a nurse because in my mind a nurse was someone who could start an IV blindfolded, resuscitate a patient while sleeping, and recognize all the signs and symptoms of septic shock at the drop of a hat.
"Put in an extra stitch." From a father talking to the provider AND from a provider talking to a father. Yeah, 'cause that didn't make me just throw up in my mouth.
By the end of June, the U. S. Supreme Court will deliver its decisions regarding same-sex marriage and, as well, the healthcare law whose controversial provisions include some contraception and abortion coverage.
I miss you when I'm not pregnant. I know it sounds a little crazy. You, the doctor every woman dreads that one time a year, because there are stirrups and cold metal and paper-thin sheets to cover everything and nothing at all, but I mean it. I really do.
For those birthing presidential campaigns and those conceiving runs for legislative power and those lusting for criminal court judgeships, The Cider House Rules and Griswold v. Connecticut should be required reading.