Office of Personnel Management

The majority of victims of bullying deal with the situation by minimization or conflict avoidance. Instead of turning to
Despite the fact that cyber-attacks occur with greater frequency and intensity around the world, many either go unreported
Major attacks on the OPM compromised sensitive data belonging to more than 22 million people.
The Princeton Group's message is simplistically clear: the latest generation of smart phones are more secure than DREs, and
Despite the fact that cyber-attacks occur with greater frequency and intensity around the world, many either go unreported or are under-reported, leaving the public with a false sense of security about the threat they pose and the lives and property they impact.
It was not very long ago that information shared with your doctor was sacrosanct, at the same remove from exposure as utterances made under the protection of an attorney-client relationship or pillow talk in a spousal bed. That may no longer be the case -- and the fallout could be life-threatening.
With more than a billion personal records "out there," identity theft has become the third certainty in life, right behind death and the topic at hand.
In September, the IRS proposed giving nonprofits the option of providing more information about people who contribute $250 or more. What kind of information you ask?
It would have been so easy for the OPM to have made at least a simple reference to the generations of LGBT employees and others who were branded "immoral" and "unsuitable" for federal employment. There has never been an apology for them.
Ron Wyden explains why he's troubled by the Senate's rush to pass a cybersecurity bill.
As the Internet spreads its tentacles into every nook of society, attacks are rapidly increasing against individuals, companies, governments, and the very Net infrastructure upon which they all rely. The attackers range from cyber criminals to non-state actors like ISIS and nation-states. But law enforcement, government regulation, and military response are not keeping up.
For almost a month, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has been engaged in damage control after publicly disclosing that it was the victim of a massive data breach of government employee data.
It now seems that the Office of Personnel Management, which had outsourced its data storage to other Federal agencies, has lost an astonishing 18 million personnel records, including most of those involving security clearances.
The data that may be compromised by the incident, which was first reported by the Associated Press, included the detailed
True or False? There was no way the Office of Personnel Management could have prevented hackers from stealing the sensitive personal information of 4.1 million federal employees, past and present. If you guessed "False," you'd be wrong. If you guessed, "True," you'd also be wrong.
Ethics laws can stop some illegal behavior but they cannot produce ethical individuals. Ethics laws can assure greater transparency but they cannot, by themselves, produce greater trust.