offices

Your unproductive behavior could be due to environmental factors and workspace design choices.
Developing successful workplaces involves initiatives big and small, temporary and long-lasting. In this era of constant change, transition should be considered a structural feature of the way workplaces will be built, with a new set of tools and approaches that deal with uncertainty.
There are few things in life that can suck the creative energy right out of you quite like that of a drab and boring office space. Homogenous rows of cubicles completely devoid of personality might be the worst, but generic beige walls and bland carpets are horribly oppressive in their own right.
Lists: I love them. Especially at this time of year. So here is one of the many lists I've written in anticipation of 2016. This one is for when a client asks me, "what's going to happen in digital?". Steal liberally!
The workplace can affect the physiological and psychological performance of people, so it is necessary to work with the users to codesign places that energize, encourage social interaction and collaboration, and enhance personal control.
The mysterious, mostly disappeared world of LIFE magazine is all still there: Staffers hacking at typewriters, beefing about the managing editor, draining double Scotches and martinis before lunch. At least in my mind it's still there.
We seem to have adjusted our performance metrics so that good means great, which surely is just not good enough. Healthy, committed and inspired people help businesses perform better, so how wonderful would it be if we aspired to be in optimum health and do great work as the norm?
Not that long ago, work was a place. Now, it's a state of mind.
We spend a lot of time exploring what the future of work is going to look like (myself included). However, it's helpful to take a step and examine some of the outdated practices and ways of thinking about work that WON'T be coming with us.
Understanding how the world of work is changing and what trends are shaping the future of work is only a part of what organizations need to focus on. Of course, to take this to the next level some kind of action needs to take place.
We do not need to rely on offices. Today, as long as we can connect to the internet we are able to get our jobs done regardless of where we are or when we are connected. This means employees can work from home offices, cafes, co-working facilities, or anywhere else they can get wifi.
Beyond saving energy and money, the psychological effect of bringing in more of the outdoors is possibly the single biggest benefit of open offices. Ten percent of absences can be attributed to having no view of the outside.
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As an architect, I'm always concerned that architecture is too clumsy to keep up with modern society--whose reflection, ideally, architectural design should be. However, my article today is about one of those thrilling situations where design is not only emphatic towards society but also becomes a catalyst for social processes;
We noticed a trend going on these days: offices in the backyard! The convenience of just walking rather than driving to work
You say you don't need a "title." You mean "office"? Go, girl! Run for Queen!
Two years of the Great Recession have done more to liberate workers from their offices than a decade of stressed-out employees
The office market in Washington, D.C., is poised to topple New York as the nation's most expensive, reflecting the declining