Oglala Lakota

Battered by poverty, discrimination and climate change, Native Americans on the Pine Ridge Reservation are raising homes – and hope – for the next generation.
“Out here, it feels like we’re in our own world. It doesn’t feel like the U.S. It feels like a third-world country.”
“They shouldn’t feel like they’re being punished for being a girl.”
He offers another, compelling and urgent, argument in favor of the Lakota Sioux inviting Occupy to assemble on the reservation
There is a town name that exists only in the minds of the people who live there. It's not on any road atlases, and won't show up in any map searches. Yet.
What's astonishing is that although Martin lives in one of the most economically challenging areas of the country, he refuses to put himself first. He struggles out of bed with one goal in mind -- to find employment for the reservation's youth.
There in a small clearing my flashlight pointed out what had happened. Lacey had given birth and shot the baby under a barbed wire fence so that she and the other horses were on one side of the fence and the foal was on the other.
There are many Oglala Lakota people that are not living on the Pine Ridge Reservation of South Dakota that are under the false impression that they are still citizens. Wrong!